Jan 9, 2019

1 business thing: Wall Street slowly getting less bullish on 2019

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Data: Analysis of Wall Street outlooks; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Barclays became the latest Wall Street firm to lower its 2019 year-end price target for the S&P 500, dropping it to 2,750 from 3,000 on Tuesday.

The big picture: Six firms have moved their guidance lower just eight days into the year. Barclays cited retail sentiment that has turned "significantly bearish," and an economic growth outlook outside the U.S. that was "not as constructive."

Yes, but: Despite the pullback, Barclays analysts did note that they still expected U.S. equities to rise overall by the end of the year. No major firm so far has revised its outlook into negative territory.

Go deeper: 2019 could be worst year for economy since '08

Go deeper

What it was like when police used tear gas to clear a path for Trump

President Trump walking back to the White House. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Moments before President Trump began his Rose Garden address, a mass of law enforcement suddenly marched forward in Lafayette Park, across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House.

Why it matters: It was a jarring scene as police in the nation's capital forcefully cleared young men and women gathered legally in a public park on a sunny evening, all of it on live television.

Trump goes full law-and-order

Photo: Tom Brenner/Reuters

President Trump's final decision to speak in the Rose Garden last evening as protests raged outside the gate was made only hours before, reflecting chaos on both sides of the fence.

Why it matters: Trump’s ultimate remarks fell where his instincts always were: blunt, brutal law and order, with extreme demonstrations of militarized “strength” and blustery threats.

Amid racial unrest, a test at the polls

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Eight states plus D.C. are holding primary elections today following a week of intense protests across the country over the brutal police killing of George Floyd.

Why it matters: It's the first major test for voting since the national outcry. Concerns over civil unrest and the police — as well as the coronavirus and expanded absentee voting — could reduce the number of voters showing up in person but heighten tensions for those who do.