Rural Western states that voted for President Trump are disproportionately affected by the government shutdown, which today sets a record as the longest in U.S. history, since federal workers there make up a large share of the workforce.

Expand chart
Data: Office of Personnel Management and Bureau of Labor Statistics. Map: Chris Canipe/Axios

The big picture: Out of the 10 states with the most affected federal employees per 10,000, 6 voted for Trump — Alaska, Montana, Wyoming, South Dakota, Idaho and West Virginia.

  • Out of the 10 states, 4 voted for Hillary Clinton — D.C., Maryland, New Mexico and Virginia.

Why it matters: Trump's hard line over wall funding could end up hurting some of the people who put him into office.

  • One example: Offices of the USDA's Farm Service Agency, which helps farmers affected by China's soybean tariffs, are closed due to the shutdown.
  • An Axios analysis from September found that Trump states were the ones hit hardest by his tariffs.

About the data: The map above shows federal workers in the nine departments affected by the partial shutdown: Homeland Security, HUD, Commerce, Interior, Transportation, State, Agriculture, Justice and Treasury.

  • The data also includes other employees who are affected: EPA, FDA, Indian Health Services, NASA and Small Business Administration.

Go deeper: All the ways Americans are feeling the effects of the shutdown

Go deeper

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 mins ago - Economy & Business

United States of burnout

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Postponed vacations, holidays in isolation and back-to-back virtual meetings are taking a toll on millions of American workers.

Why it matters: As we head into the fall, workers are feeling the burnout. Such a collective fraying of mental health at work could dampen productivity and hinder economic growth across the country.

Updated 45 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:15 p.m. ET: 33,477,825 — Total deaths: 1,003,922 — Total recoveries: 23,209,109Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:15 p.m. ET: 7,176,111 — Total deaths: 205,676 — Total recoveries: 2,794,608 — Total tests: 102,342,416Map.
  3. Health: Americans won't take Trump's word on the vaccine, Axios-Ipsos poll finds.
  4. States: NYC's coronavirus positivity rate spikes to highest since June.
  5. Sports: Tennessee Titans close facility amid NFL's first coronavirus outbreak.
  6. World: U.K. beats previous record for new coronavirus cases.

Mueller defends Russia investigation in rare public statement

Photo: David Hume Kennerly/GettyImages

Former special counsel Robert Mueller in a statement on Tuesday defended his team's handling of the Russia investigation after Andrew Weissmann, a former prosecutor in his office, wrote in a new book that investigators should have done more to hold President Trump accountable.

Driving the news: In the tell-all book, “Where Law Ends,” released on Tuesday, Weissman addresses what he calls the special prosecutor office's failures in its investigation.