Oct 2, 2017

Photo: Stephan Savoia / AP

Elon Musk is upending the automotive industry (Tesla) and space travel (SpaceX), not to mention some side projects he has digging tunnels (The Boring Company) and connecting mind and machine (Neuralink). As an entrepreneur with a demanding schedule, Musk runs his day on high-efficiency habits.

Why it matters: When we think we're getting too busy, we can take a page out of Musk's playbook.

  1. Don't skimp on sleep. Asleep by 1a.m., Musk sleeps a healthy 6-6.5 hours a night, otherwise he feels "grumpy."
  2. Get inspired in the shower. On two separate occasions, Musk cites the shower as the time and place where he gets creative inspiration and positivity.
  3. Hyper-efficient meetings. A former Tesla employee reported a conversation with another teammate who recalls a meeting with Musk. In the middle of the meeting, Elon said to a quiet meeting member: You haven't said anything. Why are you in here? While perhaps a bit harsh, it shows meetings should serve a clear and distinct purpose.
  4. Hiring test. Musk asks candidates the question: "Did they face very difficult problems and overcome them?" If they're telling the truth, they will understand the problem intricately and be able to answer any detailed question.
  5. Don't work over 100 hours a week. He tried that. 85 is good.
  6. Diet for productivity. Drink two coffees a day and diet Coke. Skip breakfast half the time. Cut down on sweets. Scarf lunch in five minutes during meetings.
  7. Exercise 1-2 times a week. Usually treadmill and lifting weights.
  8. Schedule everything, even if it's in 5-minute time slots.
  9. Manage your emotions ruthlessly. "I feel fear quite strongly. But if what I am doing is important enough, then I just override the fear," Musk said in an interview.
  10. Email. Check messages while your kids are running around; "I'm able to be with them and still be on email. I can be with them and still be working at the same time."

Go deeper

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 5,931,112 — Total deaths: 357,929 — Total recoveries — 2,388,172Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 p.m. ET: 1,711,313 — Total deaths: 101,129 — Total recoveries: 391,508 — Total tested: 15,192,481Map.
  3. States: New York to allow private businesses to deny entry to customers without masks.
  4. Public health: Louisiana Sen. Cassidy wants more frequent testing of nursing home workers.
  5. Congress: Pelosi slams McConnell on stimulus delay — Sen. Tim Kaine and wife test positive for coronavirus antibodies.
  6. Tech: Twitter fact-checks Chinese official's claims that coronavirus originated in U.S.
  7. What should I do? When you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus — Traveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it, the right mask to wear.

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Updated 29 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Twitter fact-checks Chinese official's claims that coronavirus originated in U.S.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian. Photo: Greg Baker/AFP via Getty Images

Twitter slapped a fact-check label on a pair of months-old tweets from a Chinese government spokesperson that falsely suggested that the coronavirus originated in the U.S. and was brought to Wuhan by the U.S. military, directing users to "get the facts about COVID-19."

Why it matters: The labels were added after criticism that Twitter had fact-checked tweets from President Trump about mail-in voting, but not other false claims from Chinese Communist Party officials and other U.S. adversaries.

Podcast: Trump vs. Twitter, round two

President Trump is escalating his response to Twitter’s fact check of his recent tweets about mail-in voting, issuing an executive order that's designed to begin limiting social media's liability protections. Dan digs in with Axios' Margaret Harding McGill.

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