Feb 4, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Women in energy are far less represented than corporate average

Clean-suited worker at Pinella DOE plant in 1979 developing and producing neutron generators for nuclear weapons initiation. Photo: Time Life Pictures/Department Of Energy (DOE)/The LIFE Picture Collection via Getty Images

Women have a higher level of underrepresentation in all levels of employment in companies in energy and related industries compared to other sectors.

Where it stands: About one-third of women in oil and gas, utilities and engineering jobs surveyed by consultancy McKinsey say they're usually the only woman in the room.

  • That's often an invitation for systemic challenges and micro-aggressions in the workplace, they found.

By the numbers: The survey found for women in energy, resources, and infrastructure (ER&I) jobs...

  • 38% of women said they needed to provide more evidence of competency compared to 15% of men in their field.
  • 41% of the surveyed women have had their judgement questioned in their area of expertise, compared to 39% of men.
  • 42% of women of color believe they missed out on a promotion because of their race, compared to 3% of white women.

Methodology: McKinsey reviewed 30 companies and survey data from 6,000 respondents in the ER&I sectors.

Go deeper: Women won't see equal pay for another 257 years, report says

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Egg freezing frees women from their biological clocks but isn't foolproof

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A lucrative industry for egg freezing has sprouted in the past 10 years, allowing women to postpone pregnancy. Experts say easy access to the procedure isn't translating into more women using the eggs they put on ice.

The big picture: Nearly 90% of women said they were happy they froze their eggs, regardless of whether they will ultimately get used, according to FertilityIQ, an educational and reviewing site for fertility clinics.

Go deeperArrowFeb 17, 2020 - Health

California's "woman quota" law seems to be working

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

When California passed its boardroom law requiring public companies based there to have at least one female director, there were concerns it would spark a gold rush for the same handful of well-known women — but that hasn’t happened.

Why it matters: Of the 138 women who joined all-male California boards last year, 62% are serving on their first company board, per a study by accounting firm KPMG. That means a majority of companies aren't contributing to so-called overboarding in corporate America.

All top law school journals are led by women for the first time in history

Grace Paras (left) was the editor in chief of the Georgetown Law Journal and Toni Deane (right) is the first African American to lead the publication. Photo: Astrid Riecken/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The editors in chief of law journals at the top 16 law schools in the U.S. are women for the first time in history, the Washington Post reports.

The state of play: At an event honoring the 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote that brought all of the editors together, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said, "It's such a contrast to the ancient days when I was in law school. There really is no better time for women to enter the legal profession."