Sue Ogrocki / AP

Wind executives gathered in Anaheim for the sector's annual conference are hoping the Trump administration will speed up what they characterized as a slow permitting process under President Obama.

Why it matters: President Trump hasn't said anything nice about the renewable industry generally, and the rhetoric from Cabinet members hasn't been favorable either. The focus on permitting is one sign of how the industry is repositioning itself in the wake of Trump's election after eight years of Obama, whose policies mostly supported the industries with the exception of federal permitting.

Get smart: The fossil-fuel industry complained for eight years of slow permitting processes for oil and natural-gas operations under Obama. The renewable energy sector also has to go through several federal permitting processes, including for environmental impacts, at the Interior Department and other agencies.

What we're hearing: "We're hopeful the new administration will help coordinate federal agencies better and shorten the time frames for getting the kind of regulatory approvals we need, just like any other big infrastructure whether it's oil, gas or big transmission lines," said Jeff Grybowski, CEO of Deepwater Wind, the company with the first offshore wind farm in the U.S. That farm, located off the coast of Rhode Island, took eight years to work its way through the permitting processes and went into operation last year.

Tom Kiernan, head of the American Wind Energy Association, which is hosting the conference, echoed Grybowski's comments:

"What we're looking for is a permitting process that is predictable, that is efficient, that allows for some degree of clarity and consistency and certainty at the end. The permitting processes to date has been really slow and it's unclear if at the end of the day you're going to get a permit."

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President Trump announced on Friday he will pursue an executive order requiring insurance companies to cover pre-existing conditions, something that is already law.

Why it matters: The Affordable Care Act already requires insurers to cover pre-existing conditions. The Trump administration is currently arguing in a case before the Supreme Court to strike down that very law — including its pre-existing condition protections.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8:30 p.m. ET: 4,928,802 — Total deaths: 161,052 — Total recoveries: 1,623,870 — Total tests: 60,415,558Map.
  3. Politics: Trump says he's prepared to sign executive orders on coronavirus aid.
  4. Education: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning.
  5. Public health: Surgeon general urges flu shots to prevent "double whammy" with coronavirus — Massachusetts pauses reopening after uptick in coronavirus cases.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases — Gates Foundation puts $150 million behind coronavirus vaccine production.

Trump says he's prepared to sign executive orders on coronavirus aid

President Trump. Photo: Jim watson/Getty Images

President Trump, speaking from a podium at his golf club in Bedminster, N.J., on Friday announced that he is prepared to issue executive orders suspending payroll taxes and extending enhanced unemployment benefits through the end of 2020, and halting student loan interest and payments indefinitely.

Why it matters: The impending orders come after talks between the White House and Democratic leadership collapsed Friday afternoon. But Trump said he remains committed to striking a deal with Congress on a broader stimulus package before signing the orders.