Sep 5, 2017

Who's at risk from Trump's DACA decision

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the gradual discontinuation of Barack Obama's DACA program earlier today.

Why it matters: To be approved for the program, individuals must, among other things: be going to school or have received a diploma or GED from high school; be an honorably discharged veteran from the U.S. Armed Services or the Coast Guard; and not have a serious criminal record.

The Center for American Progress, a left-leaning public policy institute, found a large percentage of surveyed DACA recipients were pursuing higher education:

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Data: Center for American Progress, National DACA Study, 2017; Note: Out of 1,374 who responded currently in school, 44.9% of the survey's total 3,063. No response not included; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

One more thing: An immediate concern was if the government would use the information provided upon application for DACA to find these individuals.A DHS spokesman said recipients' information "won't be proactively shared with ICE or CBP for enforcement purposes, unless an individual poses a risk to public safety or national security, or meets the criteria for issuance of a Notice to Appear or a referral to ICE" under USCIS criteria.

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The business of tear gas

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

U.S. forces yesterday used tear gas on peaceful protesters outside the White House gates, prior to a declared curfew, clearing a path for President Trump to visit a riot-damaged church for a photo opportunity.

The state of play: Two of the largest U.S. producers of tear gas are owned by private equity firms, but those firms have no interest in discussing their ownership.

Exclusive: Washington Post makes major move into local news

People entering the Washington Post building in D.C. in 2019. Photo: Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

The Washington Post has signed all 30 of McClatchy's local news outlets to its Zeus Performance product, a software that gives sites better speed, ad view-ability and performance, executives tell Axios.

Why it matters: By adding more local news outlets, The Post can start to build a local news ecosystem within its tech stack.

Biden: George Floyd's last words are "a wake-up call for our nation"

Former Vice President Joe Biden meets with clergy members and community activists during a visit to Bethel AME Church in Wilmington, Del. on June 1, 2020. Photo: JIM WATSON/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden will call George Floyd’s dying words “a wake-up call for our nation,” and criticize President Trump’s decision to unleash tear gas on peaceful protesters outside the White House, in a civil rights speech from Philadelphia on Tuesday.

Why it matters: Biden in the address will seek to draw a sharp contrast between himself and Trump, whose first remarks addressing nationwide unrest Monday highlighted law and order, extreme demonstrations of militarized “strength” and other blustery threats.