Sep 5, 2017

Who's at risk from Trump's DACA decision

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the gradual discontinuation of Barack Obama's DACA program earlier today.

Why it matters: To be approved for the program, individuals must, among other things: be going to school or have received a diploma or GED from high school; be an honorably discharged veteran from the U.S. Armed Services or the Coast Guard; and not have a serious criminal record.

The Center for American Progress, a left-leaning public policy institute, found a large percentage of surveyed DACA recipients were pursuing higher education:

Data: Center for American Progress, National DACA Study, 2017; Note: Out of 1,374 who responded currently in school, 44.9% of the survey's total 3,063. No response not included; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

One more thing: An immediate concern was if the government would use the information provided upon application for DACA to find these individuals.A DHS spokesman said recipients' information "won't be proactively shared with ICE or CBP for enforcement purposes, unless an individual poses a risk to public safety or national security, or meets the criteria for issuance of a Notice to Appear or a referral to ICE" under USCIS criteria.

Go deeper

Julián Castro on the issues, in under 500 words

Julián Castro. Photo: Edward A. Ornelas/Getty Images.

Editor's Note: Castro dropped out of contention for the Democratic presidential nomination on Jan. 2, 2020. Below is our original article on his candidacy.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 2, 2020

Electric school buses are batteries for the grid

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Utility companies are helping cash-strapped school districts replace diesel buses with electric ones that have a secondary purpose: helping to manage electricity demand.

Why it matters: Electric buses are cleaner, but cost about three times more. Using them for energy storage can help close that cost gap and smooth out energy demand on the electric grid.

Go deeperArrowJan 10, 2020

WaPo: Diversity among public school students rises but most teachers are white

Photo: Dan Forer/Getty Images

The racial gap between public school teachers and students continues to grow as districts struggle to find and retain teachers of color, The Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: More teachers of color lead to better attendance, fewer suspensions and higher test scores among black and Hispanic students, the Post writes. Teachers of color have higher expectations for students of color and can better relate to their experiences.

Go deeperArrowDec 28, 2019