Army Sergeant salutes. Helen H. Richardson / The Denver Post via Getty Images

The White House is “absolutely” weighing responses to the security conundrum raised by the smartphone fitness app, Strava, since “it’s really clear that that heat map is a security risk,” Rob Joyce, Trump's Cybersecurity Coordinator of the National Security Council, told Politico’s Eric Geller.

Driving the news: Strava's GPS technology has left some U.S. military personnel and bases exposed abroad — in Syria and Afghanistan, for example.

Joyce said that “policy evolution is needed,” but that “it is important to make good security policy balanced by not over reacting too.” Pentagon spokeswoman Maj. Audricia Harris said it took "matters like these very seriously and is reviewing the situation to determine if any additional training or guidance is required," BBC News reports.

Military risk: The GAO has previously assessed the security risks associated with the Internet of Things and wearable devices as they relate specifically to the Department of Defense.

  • Per the report, "risks with the devices include limited encryption and a limited ability to patch or upgrade devices. Risks with how they are used—operational risks—include insider threats and unauthorized communication of information to third parties."
  • The key point: The DoD "has not conducted required assessments related to the security of its operations."

During a morning news conference at the Pentagon, Army Col. Robert Manning III said that that DoD personnel are "advised to place strict privacy settings on wireless technologies and applications.” He added that service members are also prohibited from wearing such wireless technologies in some areas and during some operations.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 32,870,631 — Total deaths: 994,534 — Total recoveries: 22,749,163Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 7,079,689 — Total deaths: 204,499 — Total recoveries: 2,750,459 — Total tests: 100,492,536Map.
  3. States: New York daily cases top 1,000 for first time since June — U.S. reports over 55,000 new coronavirus cases.
  4. Health: The long-term pain of the mental health pandemicFewer than 10% of Americans have coronavirus antibodies.
  5. Business: Millions start new businesses in time of coronavirus.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

How the Supreme Court could decide the election

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Supreme Court isn't just one of the most pressing issues in the presidential race — the justices may also have to decide parts of the election itself.

Why it matters: Important election-related lawsuits are already making their way to the court. And close results in swing states, with disputes over absentee ballots, set up the potential for another Bush v. Gore scenario, election experts say.

Graham hopes his panel will approve Amy Coney Barrett by late October

Sen. Lindsey Graham during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Sept. 24, 2020 in Washington, DC. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Senate Judiciary Committee Chair Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told Fox News Saturday he expects confirmation hearings on Judge Amy Coney Barrett's nomination to the Supreme Court to start Oct. 12 and for his panel to approve her by Oct. 26.

Why it matters: That would mean the final confirmation vote could take place on the Senate floor before the Nov. 3 presidential election.

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