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An iceberg melting in Kulusuk, Greenland near the arctic circle. John Mcconnico / AP

Yale and George Mason universities issued their latest polling results Wednesday morning from their series of detailed climate surveys.

Why it matters: The voter data will provide political ammunition for advocates of emissions curbs and thwarting the White House push for deep cuts in green energy R&D.

Science:
  • 56% of registered voters agree that global warming is caused mostly by human activity, which is consistent with their 2016 polling.
  • But the partisan divide is stark. 45% of liberal/moderate Republicans hold that view (a nine point dip since November) and 30% of conservative Republicans do, compared to 87% and 62% for liberal and moderate Dems, respectively.
National concern:
  • 55% are very or somewhat worried about global warming, which is seven points less than the pollsters found in 2008, and again, there's a big party split.
Policy:
  • 74% want more action from corporations and industry, including 56% of Republicans. 63% want Congress to do more and 61% want Trump to take more action, but only around a third of GOP voters have that view, compared to an overwhelming share of Dems.
  • 69% support strict limits on carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants, 70% support requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a carbon tax paired with cutting other taxes (like income taxes). Two-thirds of independents and slightly under half of Republicans polled back those policies.
  • There's strong support across party lines for greater funding for renewables R&D and tax rebates for buying efficient cars and solar panels.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
2 mins ago - Economy & Business

Merger Monday has been overrun by SPACs

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Five companies this morning announced plans to go public via reverse mergers with SPACs, at an aggregate market value of more than $15 billion. And there might be even more by the time you read this.

The bottom line: SPAC merger activity hasn't peaked. If anything, it's just getting started.

Moderna says vaccine appears to protect against new COVID-19 variants

Photo: Justin Tallis/AFP via Getty Images

Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine is effective against new variants of the virus that first appeared in the U.K. and in South Africa, the company announced on Monday.

Yes, but: The vaccine was as effective against the strain from U.K., but saw a six-fold reduction in antibodies against the South Africa variant. Even still, the neutralizing antibodies generated by the vaccine "remain above levels that are expected to be protective," according to the company.

Dave Lawler, author of World
Updated 1 hour ago - World

Xi Jinping warns against "new cold war" in Davos speech

Chinese President Xi Jinping. Photo: Wang Zhao - Pool/Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping warned that a "new cold war" could turn hot, and must be avoided, in a speech on Monday at World Economic Forum’s virtual “Davos Agenda” conference.

Why it matters: Xi didn't refer directly to U.S.-China tensions, but the subtext was clear. These were his first remarks to an international audience since the inauguration of President Biden, whose administration has already concurred with Donald Trump's determination that China is committing "genocide" against Uyghur Muslims, and issued a warning about China's aggression toward Taiwan.