Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Courtesy of WeWork

WeWork is best known for its dozens of hip office buildings around the world where startups and freelancers can rent out desks by the month and mingle with each other. But the company is also working to extend its brand beyond the walls of its own buildings.

Companies "are now starting to ask if we can bring in the experience and environment to them," WeWork product chief Dave Fano told Axios of the startup's new office management services in an interview.

Why it matters: WeWork's business model has faced skepticism, especially from the real estate industry. Its potential over-reliance on the current startup boom has raised questions around its future, should there be a downturn. Showing that it's not limited to its current real estate holdings could help the company, currently valued at more than $17 billion, counter some of that skepticism.

Bringing WeWork to the office: WeWork plans to help manage and design companies' existing offices and corporate campuses on a subscription basis. The most basic service will be WeWork's own suite of office management tech tools. For companies that want more, it will deploy "community managers" who will run and manage their office space, helping it adopt the "startup" feel WeWork says many are seeking. And lastly, for those that want the full WeWork experience, it will provide design and renovation consulting services. WeWork, which first discussed its plans in April, says it can help these customers more efficiently use and manage their office space this way.

Origin: The idea came from WeWork's existing "enterprise" customers—large companies with 1,000 or more employees that have inked deals to house some of them at WeWork's buildings. Last month, these customers accounted for 30% of WeWork's sales and about 20% of its occupied office inventory, according to the company. As their co-working rentals became increasingly coveted among employees, some of these companies told WeWork that they'd like their own offices to operate in a similar way.

Two of WeWork's existing enterprise customers are currently in the process of rolling out this new service into their own offices, though the company decline to name them. IBM and Microsoft are among the big companies that have inked deals with WeWork.

Go deeper

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.