Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

WeWork’s roller coaster over the last two weeks has monopolized headlines, and now the story of the office coworking company and its high-flying CEO will be subjects of an upcoming book by Wall Street Journal reporters Eliot Brown and Maureen Farrell, they tell Axios.

The big picture: The growing influence of technology companies on the world has made them not only the subjects of regulatory and investor scrutiny, but now also the focus of grand business narratives.

The intrigue: There’s already been a string of books about tech companies’ troubles and tensions, from John Carreyrou’s “Bad Blood” (about Theranos) to Mike Isaac’s “Super Pumped” (about Uber). Brown tells Axios there’s room for more.

  • “[The story of WeWork] tells us a lot about Silicon Valley in the past decade, as well as a chunk of global finance,” says Brown, adding that he views the company as part of Silicon Valley even though it's based in New York because “its funding sources and the way it marketed itself were all in line with Silicon Valley startups."
  • "Everything about WeWork — its fundraising, its founders and its losses — has seemed bigger and more dramatic than any of the other companies I've followed, including Uber," says Farrell.
  • And the story is full of surprises even for a reporter covering the company’s every move for months—“two weeks ago I would NOT have predicted [CEO Adam Neumann] would resign,” says Brown. Farrell, who also says Neumann's resignation has been the most surprising, adds that he "is by nearly all accounts one of the most successful fundraisers who convinced global investors to give him billions for a business model that was a pretty old one."

The book will be published by Crown, an imprint of Random House. There’s no release date yet.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Ex-FDA chief: Pence campaigning after COVID exposure puts others at risk — Mark Meadows: "We are not going to control the pandemic" — COVID-19 looms over White House Halloween celebrations.
  2. Health: Fauci says maybe we should mandate masks if people don't wear them — America was sick well before it ever got COVID-19U.S. reports over 80,000 new cases for 2nd straight day.
  3. World: Spain declares new state of emergency — Polish President Andrzej Duda tests positive for COVID-19.

Senate advances Amy Coney Barrett nomination, setting up final confirmation vote

Photo: Xinhua/Ting Shen via Getty Images

The Senate voted 51-48 on Sunday to advance the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett, setting up a final confirmation vote for Monday.

Why it matters: It's now virtually inevitable that the Senate will vote to confirm President Trump's third Supreme Court nominee before the election, which is just nine days away.

Felix Salmon, author of Capital
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Wall Street is living up to its bad reputation

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Recent headlines will have you convinced that Wall Street is hell-bent on living up to all of its stereotypes.

Driving the news: Goldman Sachs is the biggest and the boldest, paying more than $5 billion in fines in the wake of the 1MDB scandal, in which billions were stolen from the people of Malaysia.