Mar 21, 2017

WeWork is raising $300 million

WeWork, the office rental company recently valued at $16 billion, is raising $300 million in new funding, according to a legal filing obtained by Axios through CB Insights, an investment database. The company's new valuation is slightly higher than when it last raised funds in March 2016: $51.81 a share, up from $50.19.

The Wall Street Journal reported on Monday, citing anonymous sources, that SoftBank has invested $300 million in WeWork as part of its upcoming Vision Fund, though documents reviewed by Axios do not name any backers. WeWork declined to comment.

Real estate ambitions: Earlier this month, WeWork also filed a document related to an upcoming investment vehicle to purchase real estate, something the company hasn't done before (it signs long-term leases for the buildings in which it operates). WeWork declined to comment on the filing, but it lists several managing directors from private equity firm Rhone Group, including at least two who specialize in real estate according to their LinkedIn profiles.

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Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,251 people and infected almost 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 1 hour ago - Health

Wells Fargo agrees to pay $3 billion to settle consumer abuse charges

Clients use an ATM at a Wells Fargo Bank in Los Angeles, Calif. Photo: Ronen Tivony/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Wells Fargo agreed to a pay a combined $3 billion to the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday for opening millions of fake customer accounts between 2002 and 2016, the SEC said in a press release.

The big picture: The fine "is among the largest corporate penalties reached during the Trump administration," the Washington Post reports.