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Rebecca Zisser/ Axios

J.P. Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon today said in a CNBC interview that he believes that Wall Street is ahead of Silicon Valley in terms of gender equality. And he's right, based on an Axios analysis of corporate diversity reports for a selection of the country's largest banks and technology companies.

Headline numbers: America's top banks have higher percentages of female employees than do technology companies, by a 48.4% to 33.2% margin.

Still not much to brag about: Both industries still feature few women in leadership positions, with Wall Street eking out a meager 25.5% to 24.8% "win" over tech.

Other findings: In terms of racial diversity, the results are mixed. Wall Street has higher percentages of black and Latino employees, but a much smaller percentage of Asian employees. Tech has more Latino and Asian employees in leadership positions than does Wall Street, which has a slightly higher percentage of black employees in leadership.

Methodology: Axios examined the most recent company-published data from the six largest American banks by market cap (Bank of America, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, Morgan Stanley and Wells Fargo) and its five largest tech companies (Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Google and Microsoft), with Uber also added for the sake of including a top startup. For gender breakdowns, we tried to use global numbers where available. Uber was the only included company that did not break out senior leadership demographics.

Go deeper

Mike Lindell moves the goalposts on a run for Minnesota governor

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House before entering on Jan. 15. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The will-he-or-won't-he speculation surrounding a possible gubernatorial run by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is destined to continue at least a bit longer.

What he's saying: Lindell told Axios that his focus is currently on proving his (baseless) claims of election fraud. He won't make a decision until that fight is resolved.

Wall Street pencils in virus variants as latest economic risk

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Wall Street is pinning its bets of an economic rebound this year on mass vaccinations and a virus brought under control, but new coronavirus strains threaten that sunny outlook, a number of firms are warning.

Why it matters: None downgraded growth forecasts because of the variants, but they’re acknowledging there’s a new asterisk to the anticipated economic recovery.

Dominion files $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit against Rudy Giuliani

Photo: Rey Del Rio/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems filed a defamation lawsuit against Rudy Giuliani on Monday seeking $1.3 billion in damages for his "demonstrably false” allegations about the company's voting machines, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Giuliani led former President Trump's efforts to overturn the results of the election and spread the baseless conspiracy theory that Dominion's voting machines flipped votes from Trump to Joe Biden.