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Photo: Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Volkswagen is set to replace its CEO Matthias Müller, who took the reins after the "diesel-gate" emissions scandal broke in 2015, with senior VW executive Herbert Diess, according to The Wall Street Journal and other outlets.

Why it matters: VW is the world's largest automaker and has been moving aggressively into vehicle electrification, including last month's announcement of plans to expand electric vehicle production capacity to 16 factories over the next five years.

The intrigue: Per the WSJ, "Such a change would mark a surprising turn of events for Mr. Müller, who was credited with steering the world’s biggest car maker by sales through its most difficult crisis, accelerating its strategy to develop electric vehicles and self-driving cars, and returning it to robust profits."

The big picture: “I think that Müller was a good person to transition the company and settle everybody down after this huge scandal,” Rebecca Lindland, an executive analyst with Kelley Blue Book, tells Axios.

  • “This is less of a sweeping change by and of the board and more about making some adjustments and fine tuning roles two-and-a-half years after the initial diesel-gate scandal,” she added.

What's next: “I don’t anticipate a significant change in Volkswagen’s strategy on electrification of their fleet,” Lindland said.

  • It's a key strategy for meeting emissions and fuel economy regulations worldwide — and in the U.S. specifically.
  • Another factor driving their decision-making: VW is undertaking a multi-billion dollar electric vehicle charging infrastructure effort nationwide as part of the wider U.S. settlement of the scandal over its use of software in large numbers of vehicles to enable evasion of pollution rules.
  • Overall, “There are regulatory reasons and of course there are legal reasons why they cannot back away from electrification,” Lindland said.

Meet the new boss: Via Bloomberg, "In tapping the 59-year-old Diess for the top job, Volkswagen would elevate a senior executive from its own ranks, while handing the reins to someone who was not at the automaker when the diesel cheating took place. Diess joined VW from German rival BMW AG in mid 2015, shortly before the scandal erupted publicly."

Go deeper

Updated 5 mins ago - World

Trudeau's Liberals set to form minority government after Canada election win

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Photo: Jeff Vinnick/Getty Images

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Liberal government was reelected for a third term in Monday's parliamentary elections, but preliminary results show it failed to win a majority.

Why it matters: Trudeau has governed Canada with a minority of legislative support in parliament for the past two years. Last month, he called for an election two years earlier than scheduled in the hope of forming a majority government.

2 hours ago - World

Reports: CIA director's team member reported Havana Syndrome symptoms

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director Bill Burns during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in April on Capitol Hill. Photo: Al Drago-Pool/Getty Images

A member of CIA director Bill Burns' team who traveled with him to India this month was treated for "symptoms consistent with Havana syndrome," CNN first reported Monday.

Why it matters: Current and former officials told the New York Times the incident signals a "possible escalation" in the mysterious neurological symptoms affecting as many as 200 Americans who've worked in overseas posts since 2016.

Pelosi's back-to-school math problem

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) may need votes from an unlikely source — the Republican Party — if she hopes to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill by next Monday, as she's promised Democratic centrists.

Why it matters: With at least 20 progressives threatening to vote against the $1.2 trillion bipartisan bill, centrist members are banking on more than 10 Republicans to approve the bill.