The production version of the VW ID.3. Courtesy: VW

Volkswagen took the wraps off its ID.3 electric vehicle — one that will be available in Europe and starts at roughly $33,000 for the base model — just ahead of the Frankfurt Motor Show yesterday.

Why it matters: The compact EV, which will start deliveries in mid-2020, could be a big step toward production of moderately priced battery-powered cars for a mass market.

  • "Everything about the ID.3, from its size and styling to its battery range and pricing, is aiming for the mass-market category," TechCrunch notes.
  • It's the first vehicle built on VW's electric modular production platform.
  • That's the system that Ford, under a recent agreement with VW, plans to use for building 600,000 EVs for delivery in Europe over the next 6 years.

What they're saying: IHS Markit analyst Tim Urquhart, in a note, says the stakes are very high for the German automaker.

  • "VW needs the ID.3 to present a compelling choice for buyers that would never before have even considered buying an EV, a true electric people’s car," he said.
  • Urquhart also notes that the 4-door hatchback is the tip of the spear for VW's "hugely ambitious" EV strategy, so it "needs to be 'right' straight out of the box," without quality glitches.

Meanwhile, the auto news site Jalopnik calls it "likely their most significant car in decades."

Of note: While it's not for sale in the U.S., the automaker plans to start selling an MEB-produced ID Crozz, a crossover vehicle, here next year (and more info seems to be trickling out this morning).

By the numbers: The vehicle's battery options start at 45 kilowatt hours (kWh) with a range of 205 miles.

  • There's also a 58 kWh version with a 260-mile range, and a 77 kWh battery pack that provides up to about 342 miles of range, VW said.

What's next: There's plenty on display — from production-ready cars to concepts — at the show that opens this week, including the production-version of the Honda E.

Go deeper: Billion-dollar bets on electric vehicles await payoff

Go deeper

Gulf Coast braces for Zeta after storm strengthens into hurricane

Hurricane Zeta's forecast path. Photo: National Hurricane Center

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday as Zeta strengthened into a hurricane and threatened Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula as it moved towards the U.S. Gulf Coast.

The state of play: Zeta was expected to make landfall on the northern part of the Yucatan Peninsula Monday night, bringing with it a "dangerous storm surge" and "heavy rainfall" as it moved into the Gulf of Mexico, the National Hurricane Service said.

Updated 51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. World: Restrictions grow across Europe.
  6. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.

Supreme Court rejects request to extend Wisconsin absentee ballot deadline

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision Monday rejected an effort by Wisconsin Democrats and civil rights groups to extend the state's deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by Nov. 3.

Why it matters: All ballots must now be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election.

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