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Vanessa Tyson, the woman who alleges Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax sexually assaulted her in 2004, released a statement Wednesday detailing her memory of the incident and rebuking his claims that the encounter was consensual.

"I cannot believe given my obvious distress, that Mr. Fairfax thought this forced sexual act was consensual. ... After the assault, I suffered from both deep humiliation and shame."

Details: Tyson, a professor at Scripps College in Claremont, California, said Fairfax kissed her after walking back to his hotel room during the Democratic National Convention in 2004, and that while it was surprising, it was "not unwelcome" and she kissed him back. Tyson alleged that even though she "had no intention of taking [her] clothes off or engaging in sexual activity," Fairfax pulled her toward his bed and forced her to perform oral sex on him.

  • After the encounter, Tyson said she avoided Fairfax the rest of the convention. She said she did not speak of the assault for years and that she suppressed her memories.
  • In October 2017, she saw a picture of Fairfax in an article about his campaign for lieutenant governor of Virginia. "The image hit me like a ton of bricks," she said.
  • Only then did she decide to tell close friends of hers, who were voters, about the assault.

Earlier this week, Tyson hired the same law firm that represented Christine Blasey Ford for her sexual assault claims against then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Go deeper: Virginia's 3 highest ranking state officials all land in hot water

Go deeper

21 mins ago - Health

Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorization for COVID-19 vaccine

Photo illustration by STR/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Moderna announced that it plans to file with the FDA Monday for an emergency use authorization for its coronavirus vaccine, which the company said has an efficacy rate of 94.1%.

Why it matters: Moderna will become the second company to file for a vaccine EUA after Pfizer did the same earlier this month, potentially paving the way for the U.S. to have two COVID-19 vaccines in distribution by the end of the year. The company said its vaccine has a 100% efficacy rate against severe COVID cases.

The social media addiction bubble

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Right now, everyone from Senate leaders to the makers of Netflix's popular "Social Dilemma" is promoting the idea that Facebook is addictive.

Yes, but: Human beings have raised fears about the addictive nature of every new media technology since the 18th century brought us the novel, yet the species has always seemed to recover its balance once the initial infatuation wears off.

Young people's next big COVID test

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Young, healthy people will be at the back of the line for coronavirus vaccines, and they'll have to maintain their sense of urgency as they wait their turn — otherwise, vaccinations won't be as effective in bringing the pandemic to a close.

The big picture: "It’s great young people are anticipating the vaccine," said Jewel Mullen, associate dean for health equity at the University of Texas. But the prospect of that enthusiasm waning is "a cause for concern," she said.