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Reproduced from EIA; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new Energy Information Administration note explores how U.S. oil production sailed past 12 million barrels per day earlier this year — all thanks to Texas.

The big picture: Texas, North Dakota and New Mexico — which also includes some of the prolific Permian Basin formation that's largely in Texas — form the center of the surge in production from onshore shale formations.

  • The chart also shows Alaska's long-term decline in output.

By the numbers: Crude oil production in Texas jumped 1.1 million barrels per day (bpd) between January 2018 and April of this year to reach roughly 5 million bpd.

Where it stands: The domestic surge isn't stopping. But it appears to be slowing. The EIA's most recent estimate is that U.S. crude oil production growth will be 1.4 million bpd this year and 900,000 in 2020, which is a lot, but not as large as last year's jump.

What's next: The next set of EIA 2019 and 2020 estimates arrives later today.

Go deeper: The shale boom has become a check on the market's long-term volatility

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Ben Sasse emerges as GOP Trump critic ahead of November

Sen. Ben Sasse walks to the Senate from the subway to vote in June. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

Sen. Ben Sasse (R-Neb.) has dialed up his spicy slams of President Trump, including this swipe at yesterday's signing ceremony: "The pen-and-phone theory of executive lawmaking is unconstitutional slop."

Why it matters: Trump increasingly looks — to business and to fellow Republicans — like a loser in November. So they're more likely to create distance to save their own skins. Sasse also won his May primary, further freeing him.

Pelosi: "States don't have the money" for Trump's unemployment order

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi claimed on "Fox News Sunday" that states don't have the funds to comply with the executive order President Trump signed on Saturday, which requires them to cover 25% of an additional $400 in weekly unemployment benefits.

Why it matters: Many state and local governments have had their budgets devastated by the economic impacts of the coronavirus, which have caused expenses to soar and revenues to plunge.

Kudlow says he regrets claiming Trump couldn't use executive order for unemployment

White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow said on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday that he regrets suggesting this week that unemployment benefits can only be extended by Congress.

Why it matters: President Trump's decision to bypass Congress to sign four executive actions, including one that provides $400 per week in extra unemployment benefits, has prompted outcry from Democrats and even some Republicans who believe he is overstepping his constitutional authority.