NRA annual convenion in May 2018. Photo: Loren Elliott/AFP/Getty Images.

U.S. gun-control groups outspent gun-rights groups for the midterm elections by 40% — largely because of funding from billionaire Michael Bloomberg — unraveling the National Rifle Association's longstanding dominance in spending on gun politics, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: It's the first time in about 20 years the spending is reversed in federal races. However, gun-control groups have outspent gun-rights advocates in state elections in recent years.

By the numbers: Data from the Federal Election Commission shows that gun-control groups spent about $20 million so far in the federal election campaign, outspending by pro-gun groups, mostly the NRA, by nearly $6 million. Per Reuters, Michael Bloomberg has promised an additional $100 million towards House and Senate Democrats this year.

Go deeper

Boycott organizers slam Facebook following tense virtual meeting

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Civil rights leaders blasted Facebook's top executives shortly after speaking with them on Tuesday, saying that the tech giant's leaders "failed to meet the moment" and were "more interested in having a dialogue than producing outcomes."

Why it matters: The likely fallout from the meeting is that the growing boycott of Facebook's advertising platform, which has reached nearly 1000 companies in less than a month, will extend longer than previously anticipated, deepening Facebook's public relations nightmare.

Steve Scalise PAC invites donors to fundraiser at Disney World

Photo: Kevin Lamarque-Pool/Getty Images

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise’s PAC is inviting lobbyists to attend a four-day “Summer Meeting” at Disney World's Polynesian Village in Florida, all but daring donors to swallow their concern about coronavirus and contribute $10,000 to his leadership PAC.

Why it matters: Scalise appears to be the first House lawmakers to host an in-person destination fundraiser since the severity of pandemic became clear. The invite for the “Summer Meeting” for the Scalise Leadership Fund, obtained by Axios, makes no mention of COVID-19.

The coronavirus is ushering in a new era of surveillance at work

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As companies continue to prepare for the return of their employees to the workplace, they're weighing new types of surveillance in the name of safety.

Why it matters: Just as the coronavirus pandemic has acted as an accelerant for the adoption of remote work, it has also normalized increased surveillance and data collection. In the post-pandemic workplace, our bosses will know a lot more about us than they used to.