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Unite the Right rally. Photo: Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The "Unite the Right" white nationalist rally that sparked riots in Charlottesville, Virginia last year is coming to the nation's capital over the weekend to commemorate last year's event.

Between the lines: Though the group will be free to commemorate last year's rally after being granted a permit by the city, businesses that rally-goers would typically look to for lodging and transportation have considered refusing them service.

The details: Businesses including Uber, Lyft and Airbnb are debating whether their members — drivers or hosts, in these cases — should have the option to refuse service to those participating in the rally.

  • Airbnb said it may expel rally participants from its service, citing its "community commitment" policy users agree to stating that everyone must be treated equally, ABC News reports.
  • Drivers for both Uber and Lyft have debated on whether they should work during the DC rally, according to the Washington Post.
  • Uber also announced it would permit its drives to kick white nationalists out of their vehicles.

The big picture: This isn't out of the blue for Uber. Drivers have previously been harassed by white nationalists while giving rides, BuzzFeed News reported. Last year, a female black driver reported racist comments from two passengers who were subsequently banned from the service.

Cities have taken extra precautions ahead of Sunday's rally as well.

  • A state of emergency has been declared in Virginia and Charlottesville for rallies commemorating last year's protests.
  • D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser promised tightened security ahead of the controversial rally, USA Today reports.

The bottom line: Companies are wary of the danger the rally could present after what happened at last year's rally in Charlottesville and don't want to have a hand in chaos that my come forth this year.

Go deeper

A divided nation flocks to partisan brands

Data: Harris Poll; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Americans are leaning into companies that have strong political positions, in the wake of one of the country's most divisive election years.

Driving the news: New rankings from the Axios/Harris 100 poll — an annual survey to gauge the reputation of the most visible brands in the country — show that brands with clear partisan identifications are becoming more popular.

America is finally winning its fight against the coronavirus

Expand chart
Data: CSSE Johns Hopkins University; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

America’s battle against the coronavirus is going great.

The big picture: For the first time in a long time, nobody needs to cherry-pick some misleading data to make it seem like things are going well, and the good news doesn’t need an endless list of caveats, either. It’s just really good news. We’re winning. Be happy.

Updated 3 hours ago - World

Over 70 dead in worst bombardments between Israel and Hamas for years

Palestinian Muslims exchange wishes for Eid al-Fitr, marking the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, near a razed building in the northern Gaza Strip town of Beit Lahia, on May 13. Israeli forces said they had killed a senior Hamas commander in May 12 airstrikes. Gaza's health ministry said children died in the strikes. Photo: Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

At least 67 Palestinians and seven Israelis have been killed in fighting between Israel's military and Hamas since Monday, per Reuters.

The big picture: The worst aerial exchanges of fire between Israel and Hamas since 2014 continued into early Thursday. It comes days after escalating violence in Jerusalem that injured hundreds of Palestinians and several Israeli police officers during protests over the planned evictions of Palestinian families from their homes.