The Trump administration is keeping the United Nations in the dark, at least so far, when it comes to the future of U.S. participation in the global climate accord struck in Paris in 2015.

We have not heard any clear signals. Of course the U.S. is a party to the agreement, so we continue to see the U.S. as the very important partner that it is to us. — Patricia Espinosa, the executive secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, to reporters in Washington on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The absence of clear information to the U.N. is another sign that Trump isn't ready to follow through on his campaign pledge to end U.S. participation in the deal—at least for now.

The Bonn, Germany-based Espinosa said shortly before her current trip to the U.S. that she was seeking a meeting with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson here, but said Tuesday that it wasn't happening. Still, she carefully declined to cast it as a snub from the Trump administration.

"They were … just looking at the possibility, but it was not confirmed," Espinosa told reporters at Georgetown University ahead of Tuesday afternoon lecture. "There are so many commitments that high-level officials have." She said the dates of her visit were timed around her lecture.

What's Next? Espinosa said onstage that the uncertainty around U.S. plans has not prompted other nations to pull back on their commitments under the carbon emissions pact that's aimed at preventing the most dangerous levels of global warming.

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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died of metastatic pancreatic cancer at age 87, the Supreme Court announced Friday evening.

Why it matters: Ginsburg had suffered from serious health issues over the past few years. Her death sets up a fight over filling a Supreme Court seat with less than 50 days until the election.

NYT: White House drug price negotiations broke down over $100 "Trump Cards"

President Trump with Mark Meadows, his chief of staff, on Sept. 3 at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Negotiations on a deal between the White House and pharmaceutical industry to lower drug prices broke down last month after Mark Meadows, the president's chief of staff, insisted that drugmakers pay for $100 cash cards to be mailed to seniors before the election, according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: Some of the drug companies feared that in agreeing to the prescription cards — reportedly dubbed "Trump Cards" by some in the pharmaceutical industry — they would boost Trump's political standing weeks ahead of Election Day with voters over 65, a group that is crucial to the president's reelection bid, per the Times.

In photos: Virginians line up for hours on first day of early voting

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

In some parts of Virginia, people waited in line up to four hours to cast their ballots on the first day of early voting, according to the Washington Post.

The big picture: The COVID-19 pandemic seems to already have an impact on how people cast their votes this election season. As many as 80 million Americans are expected to vote early, by mail or in person, Tom Bonier, CEO of TargetSmart, a Democratic political data firm, told Axios in August.