Police assist an injured man near London Bridge on Nov. 29 after reports of shots being fired on London Bridge. Photo: DANIEL SORABJI / Contributor/Getty Images

A man convicted in 2012 for terrorism offenses allegedly stabbed several people, two fatally, on Friday, before bystanders tackled him, and officers fatally shot him on London Bridge, the AP reports.

The latest: The Islamic State said, without evidence, that the London Bridge attack was carried out by one of its fighters, the group's Amaq news agency reported according to Reuters.

  • The Islamic State also said the attack was made in response to calls to target nations that have been part of a coalition trying to fight the group.

Details: Authorities identified the 28-year-old male suspect, who was convicted for his role in a 2010 plot to bomb the London Stock Exchange, per the Wall Street Journal. He had been jailed for six years before being released in Dec. 2018. Friday's attack, also deemed a terrorist incident, took place near the site of a deadly knife and van rampage in 2017.

What they're saying: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Saturday that people convicted of terrorism offenses should not be permitted to leave prison early, Reuters reports.

"I think that the practice of automatic, early release where you cut a sentence in half and let really serious, violent offenders out early simply isn't working, and you've some very good evidence of how that isn't working, I am afraid, with this case."
— Boris Johnson

Go deeper: Police confirm two dead after London Bridge stabbing

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Justice Department sues Google over alleged search monopoly

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The Justice Department and 11 states Tuesday filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using anticompetitive tactics to illegally monopolize the online search and search advertising markets.

Why it matters: The long-awaited suit is Washington's first major blow against the tech giants that many on both the right and left argue have grown too large and powerful. Still, this is just step one in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 5 million infections.

In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.