May 31, 2019

Trump's state visit to the U.K. could get awkward

Dave Lawler, author of World

Flashback to a previous Trump visit to the U.K., during which he gave an explosive tabloid interview. Credit: Axios Visuals

President Trump's state visit to the U.K. will include lunch with the Queen, tea with Prince Charles and his final meetings with outgoing Prime Minister Theresa May.

What to expect: Protests in London and, if history is a guide, some awkward interventions into British politics.

  • Trump said today that he might meet with Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage or Boris Johnson, the front-runner to succeed May as prime minister. A U.K. official who briefed reporters today said there were no such meetings on the official schedule, but "what he does in his down time is his affair."
  • Asked whether it would be appropriate for Trump to weigh in on Brexit or the Conservative leadership race, the official said that was Trump's business, adding: "I don't want to rule on appropriateness or otherwise."

The visit begins Monday. There will be a state dinner that evening and commemorations of the 75th anniversary of D-Day on Wednesday.

  • Trump is expected to meet Prince Harry but not Meghan Markle, who gave birth to the couple's first child earlier this month.

What not to expect: An address to Parliament.

  • John Bercow, speaker of the U.K. House of Commons, said in Washington this week that while there had been no formal request for such an address, "nothing has happened since" 2017 — when Bercow cited "racism and sexism" in opposing an invitation — to change his mind.
  • Bercow said Barack Obama, who did address Parliament, was "comparably popular" in Europe and the U.K., and a historic figure as America's first black president. He did acknowledge that it may have been a mistake to invite China's Xi Jinping in 2015.

Worth noting: A Times/YouGov poll out this evening shows the Liberal Democrats (!!) in first place in a potential general election, followed by the Brexit Party. Labour and the Conservatives are tied in third.

Go deeper

George Floyd updates

Protesters in Washington, D.C. on June 6. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Thousands of demonstrators are gathering in cities across the U.S. and around the world to protest the killing of George Floyd. Huge crowds have assembled in Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Chicago for full-day events.

Why it matters: Twelve days of nationwide protest in the U.S. has built pressure for states to make new changes on what kind of force law enforcement can use on civilians and prompted officials to review police conduct.

Updated 55 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 6,852,810 — Total deaths: 398,211 — Total recoveries — 3,071,142Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 p.m. ET: 1,917,080 — Total deaths: 109,702 — Total recoveries: 500,849 — Total tested: 19,778,873Map.
  3. Public health: Why the pandemic is hitting minorities harder — Coronavirus curve rises in FloridaHow racism threatens the response to the pandemic Some people are drinking and inhaling cleaning products in attempt to fight the virus.
  4. Tech: The pandemic is accelerating next-generation disease diagnostics — Robotics looks to copy software-as-a-service model.
  5. Business: Budgets busted by coronavirus make it harder for cities to address inequality Sports, film production in California to resume June 12 after 3-month hiatus.
  6. Education: Students and teachers flunked remote learning.

Why the coronavirus pandemic is hitting minorities harder

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

The coronavirus’ disproportionate impact on black and Latino communities has become a defining part of the pandemic.

The big picture: That's a result of myriad longstanding inequities within the health care system and the American economy.