Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

According to Trump's National Security Strategy, climate policies will "continue to shape the global energy system" but climate change doesn't pose an explicit national security threat.

This omission is hard to square with the Defense Department's recognition of climate as a "threat multiplier" that will exacerbate global droughts, flooding and migration and the calls on the U.S. military that accompany these destabilizing events.

The NSS is at also odds with the bipartisan defense authorization bill's warnings on climate change. An amendment acknowledges the human role in climate change and mandates that the Pentagon report on resulting "vulnerabilities to military installations" and other operational risks. It quotes military leaders, including Defense Secretary Mattis, who recognize climate change as a national security risk, and lays out the material stakes in stark terms. In the Marshall Islands, for example, "an Air Force radar installation built on an atoll at a cost of $1,000,000,000 is projected to be underwater within two decades."

Why it matters: Dollars should continue to flow to reinforce military bases facing coastal erosion, anticipate climate-driven threats and invest in technologies to liberate soldiers from vulnerable fossil fuel supply chains. If that funding stops, there will be more to worry about than a few words missing from a strategy document.

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Supreme Court won't block Rhode Island's eased absentee voting rules

Photo: Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

The Supreme Court said Thursday that it will not block Rhode Island's move to ease its requirements for absentee voting during November's election.

Why it matters: The decision is a loss for Republicans, who had requested an emergency order as the state is expected to begin mailing out its ballots.

Breaking down Uber and Lyft's threat to suspend services in California

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Uber and Lyft are ratcheting up the fight with California’s state government over the classification of drivers with a move that would deprive Californians of their ride-hailing services (and halt driver income).

Driving the news: On Wednesday, both companies said that if a court doesn’t overturn or further pause a new ruling forcing them to reclassify California drivers as employees, they’ll suspend their services in the state until November’s election, when voters could potentially exempt them by passing a ballot measure.

Trump announces normalization of ties between Israel and UAE

Israel Prime Minister Netanyahu, Trump and UAE Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed. Photo: Artur Widak/NurPhoto; Samuel Corum; Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump announced a "historic" deal Thursday which will see Israel and the UAE open full diplomatic relations and Israel suspend its annexation plans in the West Bank.

Why it matters: This is a major breakthrough for Israel, which lacks diplomatic recognition in many Middle Eastern countries but has been steadily improving relations in the Gulf, largely due to mutual antipathy toward Iran.