Photo: Evan Vucci / AP

President Trump thinks conceding that Russia interfered in the 2016 election "would give ammunition to his critics," and becomes agitated by the mere mention of the issue by his aides, according to a Washington Post report.

Why it matters: Per WaPo, Trump "has never convened a Cabinet-level meeting on Russian interference or what to do about it," and his aides think he'd treat it as "an affront" if they were to even raise the matter. A former Russia adviser to Presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton told the Post: "Putin has to believe this was the most successful intelligence operation in the history of Russian or Soviet intelligence."

  • A former senior intelligence official said raising the issue "takes the [presidential daily briefing] off the rails," so information on the topic is sometimes only included in the written briefing, not in the oral presentation.
  • He was "raging mad" that Congress tied his hands by overwhelmingly passing Russia sanctions; WaPo reports it took four days for him to be persuaded to sign the bill. Aides told him: "If you veto it, they'll override you...and you look like you're weak."
  • Senior advisers abide by a policy of "don't walk that last 5 1/2 feet" when it comes to sensitive Russia issues, meaning not to go into the Oval and give "Trump a chance to erupt or overrule on issues that can be resolved by subordinates."

Go Deeper: Read the full Post report.

Go deeper

Twitter launches warnings on election misinformation and delays

Photo courtesy of Twitter.

Twitter will start pinning notices to the top of all U.S. Twitter users’ timelines warning them that results in next week’s election may be delayed and that they may encounter misinformation on mail-in voting.

Why it matters: Delayed election results are expected across many states that are handling unprecedented amounts of absentee and mailed ballots, which President Trump has baselessly called "very dangerous" and "corrupt."

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
26 mins ago - Science

NASA confirms water exists on sunny parts of the Moon

Photo: NASA/JPL/USGS

Water on the Moon might be more easily accessible than previously thought, opening up new possible avenues for future human exploration, according to a new study.

Why it matters: NASA is aiming to send people back to the Moon as part of its Artemis program by 2024, with plans to eventually create a sustainable presence on the lunar surface. That sustainability relies on mining the moon for its resources, like water.

Updated 55 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Pence no longer expected at Amy Coney Barrett's final confirmation vote

Photo: Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence no longer plans to attend the Senate's final confirmation vote for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, a Pence aide confirmed to CNN and Politico on Monday. On Sunday, Senate Democrats' claimed that his presence after possible exposure to the coronavirus would be a "violation of common decency."

Driving the news: Five of Pence's aides were recently diagnosed with COVID-19, including his chief of staff, who is currently quarantining. Pence has continued his campaign travel despite his possible exposure, which goes against CDC guidelines.