Sait Serkan Gurbuz / AP

President Trump issued an Earth Day statement Saturday that promotes his environmental approach and underscores his sharp break with Obama-era policies.

Why it matters: Trump's statement arrives amid the "March for Science" in Washington, D.C., and cities worldwide, where demonstrators are in the streets decrying Trump's moves to cut funding for science programs, and unwind various environmental and climate regulations.

My Administration is committed to keeping our air and water clean, to preserving our forests, lakes, and open spaces, and to protecting endangered species.—President Trump

What it doesn't say: The statement breaks with many of Obama's Earth Day messages by omitting any mention of climate change.

Battle lines: The 188-word statement seeks to parry arguments that Trump's aggressive deregulatory push will hurt the planet, arguing that the administration is "reducing unnecessary burdens" while being mindful of the environment.

  • It also appears to respond to the March for Science without mentioning it directly. "Rigorous science is critical to my Administration's efforts to achieve the twin goals of economic growth and environmental protection," it states.

Quick take: The statement has language that's consistent with the administration's skepticism of the scientific consensus on human-induced global warming. "[R]igorous science depends not on ideology, but on a spirit of honest inquiry and robust debate," it states, using the type of phrasing that's common in climate-skeptic circles.

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Updated 22 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 a.m. ET: 31,245,797 — Total deaths: 963,693— Total recoveries: 21,394,593Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1 a.m. ET: 6,856,884 — Total deaths: 199,865 — Total recoveries: 2,615,949 — Total tests: 95,841,281Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Media: Conservative blogger who spread COVID-19 misinformation worked for Fauci's agency.
  5. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  6. World: U.K. upgrades COVID alert level as Europe sees worrying rise in infections — "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.

Texas and Louisiana face fresh flood threat from Tropical Storm Beta

Tropical Storm Beta slowly approaching the Texas coast on Monday. Photo: National Weather Service/Twitter

Tropical Storm Beta crossed the Texas coast near the southern end of the Matagorda Peninsula late Monday, the National Hurricane Center said, bringing with it the risk of "life-threatening storm surge" and flooding to parts of Texas and Louisiana.

What's happening: Texas Gov. Greg Abbott (R) made a disaster declaration and Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency, as the states began feeling the impact of the slow-moving storm — which was causing coastal flooding along the bays near Houston and Galveston in Texas, and the Gulf of Mexico Monday, per the National Weather Service.

Louisville police declare state of emergency as Breonna Taylor decision looms

A demonstrator holds up a sign of Breonna Taylor during a protest in Louisville, Kentucky. Photo: Brandon Bell/Getty Images

The Louisville police chief declared in a memo obtained by news outlets a "state of emergency" for the department on Monday to prepare for Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's expected announcement on the Breonna Taylor case.

Of note: Louisville has witnessed more than 115 days of protests over the police killing of Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, with calls for all the officers involved to be charged.

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