Jul 30, 2017

Trump to start selling tax reform this week

Alex Brandon / AP

President Trump will use this week to start building the case for tax reform.

  • In a small business event Tuesday afternoon at the White House, the President is expected to demand a historic overhaul of the tax code, rather than the mediocre tax cuts that most Washington veterans think are far more likely.
  • He's expected to use short remarks to attack the business tax rate and argue that the current tax code is one of the biggest obstacles to American workers and entrepreneurs getting ahead.

Watch for Trump to take his tax reform sales pitch on the road in August — with some top aides looking to stage a series of speeches through the Rust Belt.

Why this matters: Trump was never authentically enthusiastic, or even particularly knowledgeable, about repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act. Republican senators privately joke about Trump's substance-free phone calls to pitch them. "It's gonna be great," he'd tell senators, before riffing about how "the pools" (risk pools) would solve everything. But the President is authentically excited about tax reform, so we'll see if his salesmanship is more effective here.

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Trump campaign demands Sessions stop campaigning on ties to president

Photos: SAUL LOEB, NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump campaign sent a letter to former Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday demanding that he stop touting his support of the president during his run for his old Senate seat in Alabama, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Trump has had a rift with Sessions dating back to the former attorney general's recusal from the Russia investigation — a decision the president relentlessly attacked him for publicly. Trump has endorsed Sessions' opponent, former college football coach Tommy Tuberville, in the GOP primary runoff election.

How pandemics are worse than wars

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

What happens after a war? Two weeks ago, that question may have resulted in cautiously optimistic answers about America's ability to bounce back from its current crisis. Now, things aren't so clear.

Why it matters: Wars are — generally — over when they're over; then the post-war rebuilding can begin. Pandemics don't work that way; their effects reverberate for decades.

Go deeperArrow40 mins ago - Health

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 981,221 — Total deaths: 50,230 — Total recoveries: 204,605Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 226,374 — Total deaths: 5,316 — Total recoveries: 8,826Map.
  3. In Congress: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces new committee on coronavirus.
  4. 2020 update: The Democratic National Committee said its July convention will be postponed until August because of the coronavirus.
  5. Jobs update: 6.6 million people filed for unemployment last week — 3.5 million people likely lost their employer health insurance coverage.
  6. States' latest: Florida's slow response may have made its coronavirus outbreak worse — Nearly 40 states have issued stay-at-home orders.
  7. 🎧 Podcast: House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said startups will be eligible for coronavirus stimulus loans
  8. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk.
  9. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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