Alex Brandon / AP

The Trump administration is slapping sanctions on 13 "current and former Venezuelan officials associated with the Nicolas Maduro regime" in Venezuela who have been involved with corruption, human rights abuses, or those who are degrading order in Venezuela, senior administration officials told reporters Wednesday.

If carried out, this would fall under an already existing executive order.

Motivation: The U.S. is trying to discourage Maduro from establishing a national constituent assembly on Sunday, which Venezuela's majority-backed opposition opposes as well. Critics say the assembly would secure his role as dictator of the country, per Reuters.

One senior administration official said, "in short [Maduro] has ignored the Venezuelan constitution and the will of its people" since it is "designed to undermine Venezuelan democracy and designed to undermine Venezuelan people's role in deciding the future of their country." The U.S. is prepared to sanction anyone who decides to join the assembly as well.

About oil: Sanctioning crude oil could impact U.S. gasoline prices and worsen the humanitarian situation in Venezuela, per Bloomberg, but the senior U.S. administration officials said they haven't come to a conclusion about how to move forward on whether to involve oil. One official said, "all options are on the table, we have not made a decision..." One of those sanctioned includes the vice president of finance for the national oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela SA.

Context: This news comes as a 48 hour strike begins in Venezuela in opposition to the plans to establish the assembly. There have been nearly daily anti-government protests throughout Venezuela amidst shortages of medicine and food, and more than 100 people have been killed in violence since protests began this April.

The U.S. has already imposed sanctions on Venezuela, including on the chief judge and seven other members of Venezuela's Supreme Court as a response to their decision to cancel the opposition-led Congress this year. The U.S. has also sanctioned the country's vice president.

Go deeper

BP's in the red, slashing its dividend and vowing a greener future

Photo: Ben Stansall/AFP via Getty Images

BP posted a $6.7 billion second-quarter loss and cut its dividend in half Tuesday while unveiling accelerated steps to transition its portfolio toward low-carbon sources.

Why it matters: The announcement adds new targets and details to its February vow to become a "net-zero" emissions company by mid-century.

Women-focused non-profit newsrooms surge forward in 2020

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Women are pushing back against the gender imbalance in media by launching their own news nonprofits and focusing on topics many traditional news companies have long ignored.

Why it matters: "The news business is already gendered," says Emily Ramshaw, co-founder and CEO of The 19th*, a new nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom reporting at the intersection of women, politics and policy.

The U.S. is now playing by China's internet rules

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump's crackdown on TikTok suggests that the U.S. government is starting to see the internet more like China does — as a network that countries can and should control within their borders.

The big picture: Today's global internet has split into three zones, according to many observers: The EU's privacy-focused network; China's government-dominated network; and the U.S.-led network dominated by a handful of American companies. TikTok's fate suggests China's model has U.S. fans as well.