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Photo: Jim Watson/Getty Images

President Trump inched closer to supporting tariffs on oil imports on Saturday as one way to help the industry in historic turmoil over rock-bottom prices.

Why it matters: More than 70 oil companies could go bankrupt in the coming months, consultancy Rystad Energy said Friday, if U.S. oil prices are around $30 a barrel — which is above where they’ve been lately.

Driving the news: “If I have to do tariffs on oil coming from outside or something to protect tens of thousands of energy workers in our great companies that produce these jobs, I will do what I have to do,” Trump said at Saturday’s briefing.

Between the lines: His comments represent a shift toward supporting such a move, one of the more aggressive steps the government could take, compared to Friday’s briefing.

The big picture: As the coronavirus pandemic threatens lives around the world, it’s shutting down a global economy driven by oil consumption. This, along with a related price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, is sending oil prices into a tailspin and producers are scrambling to stay afloat.

  • Trump and his administration have been prodding Saudi and Russian officials to strike a deal to cut production and raise prices.

The intrigue: While all oil companies are suffering under cheap prices, bigger producers don’t support tariffs or other measures where the government would directly intervene in oil markets. Officials regulating the sector are also hesitant.

  • Ryan Sitton, a commissioner of the Texas Railroad Commission, which regulates the state’s oil production, said he doesn’t support tariffs.
  • “My hope is that we don’t get to that, my hope is that the market gets balanced through good leadership on behalf of major oil producers,” said Sitton, referring to the U.S. (mainly Texas) and Saudi Arabia and Russia.

What we’re watching: Canada is in discussions with the U.S. about the possibility of tariffs on Saudi and Russian oil if the two countries don’t quickly reach a deal on a price war, the Financial Times reported earlier Saturday.

Go deeper: Trump reluctant to intervene in oil markets

Go deeper

3 hours ago - World

In photos: Protests in U.S., across the world over Israeli–Palestinian conflict

A protest march in support of Palestinians near the Washington monument in Washington, D.C. on May 15. Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

Thousands of people rallied across the U.S. and the world Saturday following days of violence in Gaza and Israel that's killed at least 145 Palestinians, including 41 children, and eight Israelis, per AP.

The big picture: Most demonstrations were in support of Palestinians. There were tense scenes between pro-Israeli government protesters and pro-Palestinian demonstrators in Winnipeg, Canada, and Leipzig, Germany, but no arrests were made, CBS News and DW.com report.

Updated 10 hours ago - World

Biden in call with Netanyahu raises concerns about civilian casualties in Gaza

Photo: Ahmad Gharabli/Nicholas Kamm/Getty Images

President Biden spoke to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Saturday and raised concerns about civilian casualties in Gaza and the bombing of the building that housed AP and other media offices, according to Israeli officials.

The big picture: At least 140 Palestinians, including dozens of children, have been killed in Gaza since fighting between Israel and Hamas began Monday, according to Palestinian health officials. Nine people, including two children, have been killed by Hamas rockets in Israel.

Updated 11 hours ago - Politics & Policy

"Horrified": AP, Al Jazeera condemn Israel's bombing of their offices in Gaza

A ball of fire erupts from the Jalaa Tower as it is destroyed in an Israeli airstrike in Gaza. Photo: Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Associated Press and Al Jazeera on Saturday condemned the Israeli airstrike that destroyed a high-rise building in Gaza that housed their and other media offices.

What they're saying: The White House, meanwhile, said it had "communicated directly to the Israelis that ensuring the safety and security of journalists and independent media is a paramount responsibility," according to press secretary Jen Psaki.