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White House Deputy Director of Political Affairs Scott Jennings (R) consults with White House Special Counsel Emmet Flood (L) August 2, 2007. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The New York Times reports that a former Clinton impeachment lawyer, Emmet Flood, will replace Ty Cobb as White House counsel upon his retirement.

The details: "Mr. Flood is expected to take a more adversarial approach to the investigation than Mr. Cobb, who had pushed Mr. Trump to strike a cooperative tone. Mr. Flood initially spoke with the White House last summer about working for the president," per the Times.

What they're saying: The White House released a statement on Cobb's departure explaining, “[f]or several weeks Ty Cobb has been discussing his retirement and last week he let Chief of Staff Kelly know he would retire at the end of this month.”

The intrigue: Special counsel Robert Mueller recently provided President Trump’s lawyers with a list of dozens of questions on various issues he wants to ask Trump if given the opportunity to interview him as part of his Russia investigation. He also recently added confidant Rudy Giuliani to his legal team following the resignation of Trump's lead lawyer, John Dowd, in March.

  • The Times adds, "The president’s legal team for the special counsel investigation has been marked by turnover and uncertain strategy, complicated by a client liable to dismiss his lawyers’ advice." Likely a factor that prompted Dowd's resignation.

His background: Flood was on Clinton's legal team during his impeachment proceedings, adds the Times. Adding to his resume, Flood was the lead lawyer for the White House during former President George W. Bush's defense in dealing with congressional investigations. He has also privately represented former Vice President Dick Cheney.

Ty Cobb told Fox News' Major Garrett, "[p]eople will think this means we’re going to war but I would not read that into this. This is good for me. I have postponed many orthopedic procedures and basically been living in an attic ... The key point is all the documents requested by the Special Counsel were produced by late October. All the interviews with White House personnel were conducted by late January. The bulk of the work was done.”

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Far-right figure "Baked Alaska" arrested for involvement in Capitol siege

Photo: Shay Horse/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The FBI arrested far-right media figure Tim Gionet, known as "Baked Alaska," on Saturday for his involvement in last week's Capitol riot, according to a statement of facts filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia.

The state of play: Gionet was arrested in Houston on charges related to disorderly or disruptive conduct on the Capitol grounds or in any of the Capitol buildings with the intent to impede, disrupt, or disturb the orderly conduct of a session, per AP.