White House Deputy Director of Political Affairs Scott Jennings (R) consults with White House Special Counsel Emmet Flood (L) August 2, 2007. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The New York Times reports that a former Clinton impeachment lawyer, Emmet Flood, will replace Ty Cobb as White House counsel upon his retirement.

The details: "Mr. Flood is expected to take a more adversarial approach to the investigation than Mr. Cobb, who had pushed Mr. Trump to strike a cooperative tone. Mr. Flood initially spoke with the White House last summer about working for the president," per the Times.

What they're saying: The White House released a statement on Cobb's departure explaining, “[f]or several weeks Ty Cobb has been discussing his retirement and last week he let Chief of Staff Kelly know he would retire at the end of this month.”

The intrigue: Special counsel Robert Mueller recently provided President Trump’s lawyers with a list of dozens of questions on various issues he wants to ask Trump if given the opportunity to interview him as part of his Russia investigation. He also recently added confidant Rudy Giuliani to his legal team following the resignation of Trump's lead lawyer, John Dowd, in March.

  • The Times adds, "The president’s legal team for the special counsel investigation has been marked by turnover and uncertain strategy, complicated by a client liable to dismiss his lawyers’ advice." Likely a factor that prompted Dowd's resignation.

His background: Flood was on Clinton's legal team during his impeachment proceedings, adds the Times. Adding to his resume, Flood was the lead lawyer for the White House during former President George W. Bush's defense in dealing with congressional investigations. He has also privately represented former Vice President Dick Cheney.

Ty Cobb told Fox News' Major Garrett, "[p]eople will think this means we’re going to war but I would not read that into this. This is good for me. I have postponed many orthopedic procedures and basically been living in an attic ... The key point is all the documents requested by the Special Counsel were produced by late October. All the interviews with White House personnel were conducted by late January. The bulk of the work was done.”

Go deeper

28 mins ago - Podcasts

The art and business of political polling

The election is just eight days away, and it’s not just the candidates whose futures are on the line. Political pollsters, four years after wrongly predicting a Hillary Clinton presidency, are viewing it as their own judgment day.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the polls, and what pollsters have changed since 2016, with former FiveThirtyEight writer and current CNN politics analyst Harry Enten.

Twitter launches warnings on election misinformation and delays

Photo: courtesy of Twitter

Twitter will start pinning notices to the top of all U.S. Twitter users’ timelines warning that results in next week’s election may be delayed and that they may encounter misinformation on mail-in voting.

Why it matters: Delayed election results are expected across many states that are handling unprecedented amounts of absentee and mailed ballots, which President Trump has baselessly called "very dangerous" and "corrupt."

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
3 hours ago - Science

NASA confirms water exists on sunny parts of the Moon

Photo: NASA/JPL/USGS

Water on the Moon might be more easily accessible than previously thought, opening up new possible avenues for future human exploration, according to a new study.

Why it matters: NASA is aiming to send people back to the Moon as part of its Artemis program by 2024, with plans to eventually create a sustainable presence on the lunar surface. That sustainability relies on mining the moon for its resources, like water.