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Photo: Olivier Douliery/AFP via Getty Images

Roughly 3.7 million fewer people could receive food assistance through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) if the Trump administration's proposed restrictions are implemented, a recent Urban Institute study found.

What they found: Households in California, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Washington state and Texas would be disproportionately affected by the restrictions.

  • SNAP participation would fall by at least 15% in 13 states, and 24% in Washington, D.C.
  • Almost 75% of households with gross income above 130% of the federal poverty guidelines would lose SNAP eligibility.
  • Roughly half a million households with children would lose eligibility, and 1.1 million would incur an average of $28 less in benefits.
  • 1 million households with children would have an average of $13 more in benefits.

What they're saying: A bipartisan coalition of 70 mayors stated their "strong opposition" to the administration's proposed restrictions in August, warning changes to the program would harm local and regional economies.

Background: The administration has proposed three core SNAP restrictions:

  1. Limiting states' ability to request time limit waivers for able-bodied adults.
  2. Tightening residents' ability to become automatically eligible for food stamps if they receive benefits from another federal program.
  3. Setting uniform standard utility allowances.

Methodology: The study measured the possible effects of Trump's proposed regulations on households from 2018.

Go deeper: Trump administration plans to take 3M Americans off food stamps

Go deeper

Updated 12 mins ago - Politics & Policy

The massive early vote

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Early voting in the 2020 election across the U.S. on Saturday had already reached 65.5% of 2016's total turnout, according to state data compiled by the U.S. Elections Project.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic and its resultant social-distancing measures prompted a massive uptick in both mail-in ballots and early voting nationwide, setting up an unprecedented and potentially tumultuous count in the hours and days after the polls close on Nov. 3.

Updated 34 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Ipsos poll: COVID trick-or-treat.
  2. World: Greece tightens coronavirus restrictions as Europe cases spike — Austria reimposes coronavirus lockdowns amid surge of infections
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Technology: Fully at-home rapid COVID test to move forward.
  5. States: New York rolls out new testing requirements for visitors.

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.