Apr 4, 2017

Trump blames Obama for deadly chemical weapons attack in Syria

SANA via AP

The White House is pointing the finger at Barack Obama after the Assad regime carried out a chemical weapons attack today that has left at least 60 dead and more than 100 injured.

President Trump released a statement noting that the "heinous" attacks came after Obama "did nothing" to enforce his red line over chemical weapons in Syria:

"These heinous actions by the Bashar al-Assad regime are a consequence of the past administration's weakness and irresolution."

Silence at State: Meanwhile Rex Tillerson declined to answer when reporters asked him about the attack, the State Dept did not offer any public comment until hours after the attack. Tillerson and Nikki Haley shifted from the Obama-era protocol on Assad last week, saying the US would no longer prioritize removing the Syrian dictator from power.

Update: Tillerson later released a statement which did not mention Obama and condemned Assad for showing "a fundamental disregard for human decency."

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