Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Chatter is building on whether the Trump administration will stay or withdraw from a global climate accord, struck in 2015 by nearly 200 nations, ahead of the administration's anticipated decision by the end of next month.

Driving the news: George David Banks, a top advisor in the Trump White House for global climate and energy issues, is working to keep the U.S. government in the deal while throwing out the Obama administration's pledge to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions specific levels.

The other side: Myron Ebell, a top expert at the Competitive Enterprise Institute and former transition advisor for Trump's EPA, represents the right flank of the GOP that wants America out of the climate deal altogether. He says he prefers the administration pull out entirely, but his rhetoric is softening oh so slightly, and he's saying now that no matter what decision is made, it'll be portrayed as withdrawal.

"I'm pretty sure whatever they do they're going to say it's withdrawal," Ebell told Axios. "There are different ways to withdraw."

What that means: Ebell says the Trump administration could withdraw President Obama's pledge, which is the current leading possibility.

Reality check: During the campaign, Trump said he would "cancel" the Paris deal, which is technically impossible. Dropping Obama's pledge is also not technically withdrawing from the deal, but it's a nuanced detail that can easily be overlooked and massaged as necessary in rallies and meetings when appropriate by administration officials.

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23 million Americans face eviction

Natasha Blunt of New Orleans, who is at risk of eviction. Photo: Dorthy Ray/AP

The coronavirus pandemic threatens America with a new wave of homelessness due to a cratering economy, expiring unemployment stimulus payments and vanishing renter protections.

What they're saying: "I've never seen this many people poised to lose their housing in such a short period of time," said Bill Faith of the Coalition on Homelessness and Housing in Ohio to AP.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 18,624,056 — Total deaths: 702,479 — Total recoveries — 11,181,518Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 4,802,275 — Total deaths: 157,551 — Total recoveries: 1,528,979 — Total tests: 58,239,438Map.
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  5. Business: America's next housing crisis.
  6. Education: Chicago Public Schools to begin school year fully remote.
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Beirut explosion: Death toll rises to 135, officials under house arrest

Photo: Anwar Amro/AFP via Getty Images

The death toll from Tuesday's explosion in Beirut, Lebanon has now surpassed 130, including at least one U.S. citizen, amid a search for answers as to why a huge store of ammonium nitrate was left unsecured near the city's port for nearly seven years.

What we know: The government says around 5,000 people are injured. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said current indications are that the massive explosion was accidental, despite President Trump's puzzling claim on Tuesday evening that it appeared to be a bomb attack.