Jan 3, 2019

Report: Trump's DOJ weighs cutting of anti-discrimination regulations

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Justice Department is weighing a rollback of civil rights regulations designed to protect against discrimination, The Washington Post reports.

Driving the news: An internal DOJ memo directed senior civil rights officials to determine if it would be possible to change or remove "disparate impact" regulations from the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which deem actions as discriminatory even if discrimination was not intended. The Education Department and the Department of Housing and Urban Development are considering similar action, per WashPost.

Go deeper: Report finds protections for minority voters have plunged since 2013

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Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,251 people and infected almost 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

Wells Fargo agrees to pay $3 billion to settle consumer abuse charges

Clients use an ATM at a Wells Fargo Bank in Los Angeles, Calif. Photo: Ronen Tivony/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Wells Fargo agreed to a pay a combined $3 billion to the Justice Department and the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday for opening millions of fake customer accounts between 2002 and 2016, the SEC said in a press release.

The big picture: The fine "is among the largest corporate penalties reached during the Trump administration," the Washington Post reports.