Toyota's "e-Palette" electric vehicle. Photo: Toyota

Toyota, which has a partnership with Tokyo's 2020 Summer Olympics, has announced the slate of electric vehicles that will be used to move fans, athletes and others around the games.

By the numbers: The auto giant said that it's providing 3,700 "mobility products and/or vehicles" for the Olympic and Paralympic Games. 90% will be electrified in some way, including roughly 850 fully battery-powered vehicles and 500 fuel-cell vehicles, the automaker said Friday. The "e-Palette" will "support transportation needs of staff and athletes, with a dozen or more running on a continuous loop within the Olympic and Paralympic Village."

Go deeper: Regulating the humans behind the wheels of autonomous vehicles

Editor's note: The headline in this story has been updated to reflect that Toyota plans to release an electric vehicle fleet for the 2020 Olympics, not an autonomous fleet.

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