Mark Warner is the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee. Photo: Pablo Martinez Monsivais

The top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee said Thursday he wasn't satisfied with Twitter's Capitol Hill presentation into possible Russian election meddling on its platform — calling it "frankly inadequate on almost every level." The company told congressional investigators earlier today that it had found just over 200 accounts linked to a Russian effort disclosed by Facebook to purchase advertisements that highlighted divisive political issues.

Why it matters: This just increases the pressure on Facebook, Twitter and Google parent Alphabet — all of whom have been invited to appear before the Senate Intelligence Committee in early November.

The details: Sen. Mark Warner said during a press conference that he was upset the company had based its search only on the accounts Facebook had disclosed as behind about $100,000 ad buys focused on controversial political issues before and after the presidential campaign.

"The presentation that the Twitter team made to the Senate Intel staff was deeply disappointing," he said. "The notion that their work was basically derivative based upon accounts that Facebook had identified showed an enormous lack of understanding from the twitter team of how serious this issue this, the threat it poses to democratic institutions, and again begs many more questions than they offered."

What's next?: Warner's committee has invited Facebook, Alphabet and Twitter to testify on November 1. Now the pressures are greater than ever.

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Justice Department sues Google over alleged search monopoly

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

The Justice Department and 11 states Tuesday filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, accusing the company of using anticompetitive tactics to illegally monopolize the online search and search advertising markets.

Why it matters: The long-awaited suit is Washington's first major blow against the tech giants that many on both the right and left argue have grown too large and powerful. Still, this is just step one in what could be a lengthy and messy court battle.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 5 million infections.

In photos: Florida breaks record for in-person early voting

Voters wait in line at John F. Kennedy Public Library in Hialeah, Florida on Oct. 19. Photo: Eva Marie Uzcategui/AFP via Getty Images

More Floridians cast early ballots for the 2020 election on Monday than in the first day of in-person early voting in 2016, shattering the previous record by over 50,000 votes, Politico reports.

The big picture: Voters have already cast over 31 million ballots in early voting states as of Tuesday, per the U.S. Elections Project database by Michael McDonald, an elections expert at the University of Florida.