Apr 25, 2017

The shape of income in America

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics

This chart shows how weekly incomes for workers 25 and older vary by education level, gender, and race/ethnicity. Each bar represents an education level — less than high school, high school, some college, bachelor's degree, and advanced degrees. The width of the bar is what share of each demographic has the given educational attainment. The height of each bar is the income range for each level of education — the upper limit is the 90th percentile, the lower limit is the 10th percentile, and the middle number is the median. Use the arrows to scroll through different demographics.

  • Educational attainment: Last week, we published a chart showing how Asians — especially men — out-earn all other demographics. This chart makes the reason clear: According to the BLS data used for this chart, about 65 percent of Asian men and 63 percent of Asian women hold a college degree of greater.
  • Women are more educated: In every group except Asians, more women than men hold college and advanced degrees — white men (37.5%), white women (44.7%); black men (28.2%), black women (34.8%); Hispanic men (17.5%), Hispanic women (25.6%); Asian men (65.2%), Asian women (62.9%).
  • The pay gap: Men out-earn women in every education level, and even at the occupation level, the gap persists.

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Why 50+ women care about 2020

Data: AARP/Harris Poll; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new AARP survey by the Harris Poll examined what's driving women 50 and older ahead of next year's elections and found health care on top. The survey also found that older women’s concerns about Trump are eroding, but not upending, his support with Republicans and independents.

Why it matters: As the House of Representatives prepares to impeach the president, the priorities for this group of high-propensity voters are closer to home and different from what their male counterparts care most about.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019

Lacrosse and track and field are on the rise

Reproduced from NCAA Research; Chart: Axios Visuals

Over the past decade, the NCAA men's and women's sports with the largest net gains in participating teams, across all divisions, are lacrosse and track and field, per NCAA data.

The other side: Gymnastics, rifle and skiing all saw a decline in both men's and women's programs, while tennis, fencing, water polo and women's rowing (men's rowing isn't sanctioned by the NCAA) saw virtually no increase.

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Women take the lead on donating to support female college sports

The Indiana Hoosiers celebrate after the NCAA Women's College Basketball game. Photo: Bobby Goddin/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Former female athletes are donating millions of dollars to build facilities, endow scholarships and support coaching positions at their alma maters, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Participation in women’s college sports teams is at an all time high, outnumbering men's sports for more than 20 years. And yet, the marketing and sponsorships from benefactors for college female teams has caught on slower than men's sports.

Go deeperArrowDec 25, 2019