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America's right flank is at war with itself over climate-change science, and the latest battle is this week in Nashville.

Driving the news: The American Legislative Exchange Council, a policy group of conservative state lawmakers and companies, holds a meeting Thursday in Nashville, Tenn. Members of one of its task forces are expected to vote on whether to draft a proposal calling on the Environmental Protection Agency to withdraw a scientific finding that greenhouse gas emissions endanger public health and welfare.

Quoted: Steve Milloy, who runs a website that tries to dispute the scientific consensus that human activity is a major contributor to climate change, said on Twitter Tuesday he hopes to defeat ExxonMobil and other members of the group that have publicly said they oppose any effort to undo the EPA's scientific finding.

"For the record, ExxonMobil is on the side of climate bedwetters. The once sensible company wants EPA to regulate CO2 so it can put small, independent oil & gas firms out of business. Exxon is anti-science, anti-competitive and siding with anti-American greens."

The big picture: Most currently elected Republicans in Congress and corporations are not publicly questioning the scientific consensus on climate change today, though some have pushed such a false narrative in recent years past. Their positions today put them at odds with a loud group of conservative leaders, such as Milloy, who have influence with some Trump administration officials who share their skepticism. Most leaders on the right don't support any major policy to address climate change however, no matter what they think about the science.

Go deeper:

  • Exxon's official opposition of the policy, per The Hill Tuesday.
  • Environment & Energy Daily had this in-depth article a couple weeks ago, and reporter Zack Colman will be on the ground in Nashville for the next two days.
  • Two Democratic senators criticized some of the corporate members of the group in a Washington Post op-ed on Tuesday.

(This story has been updated to correct the spelling of Zack Colman's last name.)

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  4. 🎧Podcast: The vaccine race turns toward nationalism.

Technical glitch in Facebook's ad tools creates political firestorm

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: SOPA Images / Contributor

Facebook said late Thursday that a mix of "technical problems" and confusion among advertisers around its new political ad ban rules caused issues affecting ad campaigns of both parties.

Why it matters: A report out Thursday morning suggested the ad tools were causing campaign ads, even those that adhered to Facebook's new rules, to be paused. Very quickly, political campaigners began asserting the tech giant was enforcing policies in a way that was biased against their campaigns.

8 hours ago - Health

States beg for Warp Speed billions

A COVID-19 drive-thru testing center yesterday at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens. Photo: David Santiago/Miami Herald via AP

Operation Warp Speed has an Achilles' heel: States need billions to distribute vaccines — and many say they don't have the cash.

Why it matters: The first emergency use authorization could come as soon as next month, but vaccines require funding for workers, shipping and handling, and for reserving spaces for vaccination sites.

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