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Screen grab from The Best of Freakonomics with Stephen Dubner and Steven Levitt, moderated by Faith Salie. https://youtu.be/nhfWR1q6kYE

By nearly every metric, podcasts are growing more and more popular, according to Adweek. And they can be highly lucrative: NPR's podcasts added over a million listeners between 2015 to 2016, and Slate's podcast the Slate Political Gabfest made $1 million in revenue last year.

But what do people listen to the most? Podtrac has a list of July's most popular podcasts:

  1. The American Life - This American Life
  2. Stuff You Should Know - HowStuffWorks
  3. RadioLab - WNYC Studios
  4. TED Radio Hour - NPR
  5. Planet Money - NPR
  6. Up First - NPR
  7. Freakonomics - WNYC Studios
  8. Fresh Air - NPR
  9. Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me! - NPR
  10. The Daily - The New York Times

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
16 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Biden's plan to upend Trump's environmental legacy

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo by Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden will on Wednesday order a government-wide review of over 100 Trump-era policies and direct agencies to prepare a suite of emissions and energy efficiency rules.

Why it matters: New information from transition officials offers the full scope of Biden's imminent, inauguration-day burst of environmental and energy policy moves.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
17 mins ago - Health

The public health presidency

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Joe Biden will take office today facing a challenge none of his modern predecessors have had to reckon with — his legacy will depend largely on how well he handles a once-in-a-century pandemic that's already raging out of control.

The big picture: Public health tends to be relatively apolitical and non-controversial. The limelight in health care politics typically belongs instead to debates over costs and coverage. But that will all change for the Biden administration.

D.C. braces for economic hit from scaled-back inauguration

Photo: Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The days leading up to and including Inauguration Day typically generate $31.4 million in additional sales for D.C. businesses — but not this year.

Why it matters: Washington's economy is already suffering from pandemic-induced closures, and could very much use the revelry and tourist dollars that Inauguration Day brings — instead of the large bills that will pile up if there's further mayhem or if visitors continue to stay away.