The Pew Research Center is out with new data that shows wealthy U.S. adults are more likely to say that the statement that "home internet service is affordable enough that nearly every household should be able to buy service on their own" describes their views, rather than "the government should provide subsidies to help low-income Americans purchase high-speed home internet service." There's a sharp divide by party, too.

Why it matters: There's probably a fight coming over the future of the FCC's "Lifeline" program, which uses fees collected from consumers to fund subsidies for low-income people to access internet and phone service. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has floated the idea of adding a co-pay to the service and capping its budget, but said he doesn't intend to remove broadband from the program entirely.

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Data: Pew Research Center; Note: "Dem" and "GOP" includes respondents "leaning Dem" and "leaning GOP"; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

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Appeals court allows House Democrats to continue lawsuit for Don McGahn testimony

Don McGahn in an October 2018 Cabinet meeting. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A D.C. appeals court on Friday allowed House Democrats to continue their case for testimony from former White House counsel Don McGahn before the House Judiciary Committee.

Why it matters: McGahn was one of the most important witnesses in Robert Mueller's investigation. He appears on 66 pages of the Mueller report and played a central role in some of its juiciest revelations, including the fact that President Trump once asked him to fire Mueller.

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

TikTok has become a Rorschach test for how U.S. politicians view China, with little consensus on the specifics of its threat to homeland security.

The big picture: Much of what D.C. fears about TikTok is fear itself, and that's reflected in President Trump's executive order to ban the app by Sept. 20 if it's not sold by parent company ByteDance — alongside another focused on Chinese messaging app WeChat and its parent company Tencent.

U.S. sanctions Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam

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The Treasury Department on Friday placed sanctions on Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam, following months of tension as she has allowed continued overreach by Beijing to subvert Hong Kong's autonomy.

Why it matters: It's the toughest sanction yet imposed on China for its destruction of Hong Kong’s relatively free political system.