Jan 10, 2018

The Kodak blockchain experiment

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Data: Money.net; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Shares of Kodak surged after the company's CEO announced a "major blockchain initiative." Photographers "struggle to assert control over their work," so the company said it's experimenting with digital ledgers (the tracking tech behind Bitcoin) to help camera pros more easily get paid when licensing their like-worthy work.

  • Kodak, which was founded in 1888, failed to recognize the the digital photography revolution and went bankrupt in 2013. Even though the stock's down 73% in the last year, Tuesday's win pumped its value up to $178 million.

The takeaway: Bitcoin is the Viagra of flaccid stocks. Random companies like drink-maker Long Island Iced Tea and biotech firm Riot surged 200% each lately simply on word they may add blockchain technology into their business models. Kodak though is going all in — it's also using an ICO ("Initial Coin Offering") to offer cryptocurrencies for cash to fund its "KodakCoin" project.

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Using blockchain to ensure olive oil really is extra virgin

Photo courtesy of CHO

Large olive oil producer CHO is using IBM's food blockchain to allow customers to track their oil — from the orchard where the olives are grown, through the mill where they are crushed, to the facilities where the oil is filtered and bottled.

Why it matters: Assuring food safety and quality seems to be one of the most compelling uses for the much-hyped technology.

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Takeaway.com ups its takeover bid in effort to beat out Prosus for Just Eat

Takeaway.com appears poised to beat out Dutch conglomerate Prosus for London-based food delivery company Just Eat, after raising its takeover offer to nearly £6.3 billion in stock.

Why it matters: Because appearances may be deceiving. Yes, Just Eat's board this morning recommended Takeaway's offer, and lowered the shareholder approval threshold to just 50%.

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The 2010s: When all companies became tech companies

Tech companies dominated the 2010s, with the FANG stocks (Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Google) helping the S&P 500 return more than 350% over the course of the decade. The index would have done even better had it included Domino's Pizza, which is also a tech company.

Why it matters: These companies don't look like the tech firms of earlier decades. They don't manufacture computer hardware; neither do they sell software. They don't even make high-tech planes, like Boeing, or high-tech cars, like Tesla.

Go deeperArrowJan 2, 2020