Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios Pro Rata

Dive into the world of dealmakers across VC, PE and M&A with Axios Pro Rata. Delivered daily to your inbox by Dan Primack and Kia Kokalitcheva.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Nashville news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Nashville newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Columbus news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Columbus newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Dallas news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Dallas newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Austin news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Austin newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Atlanta news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Atlanta newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Philadelphia news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Philadelphia newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Chicago news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios Chicago newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top DC news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with the Axios DC newsletter.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo illustration: Greg Ruben / Axios

The FCC subsidy program that pays for phone and internet service for low-income people — derisively called "Obamaphone" by critics—stands to be overhauled now that Republicans are in control.

The so-called Lifeline program, which was actually created during the Reagan administration, started to see signs of change last week when new FCC Chairman Ajit Pai revoked the participation of nine providers in the program, saying the applications needed more review.

Democrats worry the FCC will take more drastic measures. While Pai and Republicans in Congress have long argued the Lifeline program needs reform to cut waste and fraud, they haven't yet laid out a roadmap for how they'll change it.

Adding a budget cap: In 2015, as the FCC headed toward expanding the program to cover internet service, Pai said the agency should have considered placing a cap on the program's budget of $1.6 billion to align with spending on the subsidies that year. "A budget induces careful spending," he said in a dissent the next year. The idea has support in Congress, where one bill would set the cap at $1.5 billion.

  • The counterpoint: Opponents of a cap say that it would arbitrarily keep eligible Americans out of the program. "A cap on the Lifeline program will inherently exclude an undetermined number of the eligible low-income consumers," said Scott Bergmann, an executive with wireless trade group CTIA, in congressional testimony last year.

Targeting subsidies more narrowly: Pai and Republican Commissioner Michael O'Rielly both support the idea of targeting the program's subsidies. That's echoed in Congress. Marsha Blackburn, who now chairs the House subcommittee on Communications issues, wrote with O'Rielly in 2015 that "the program must be better targeted to eligible low-income individuals who would not otherwise sign up for service."

  • The counterpoint: Jessica Gonzalez, Deputy Director and Senior Counsel at advocacy group Free Press, said that restricting subsidies could cause trouble for poor people who are stretched thin financially. "When you're right on that line, you're making hard decisions," she said.

Asking subscribers to contribute: Pai floated the idea in 2015 of "requiring Lifeline subscribers to pitch in as a condition of getting service." (It wasn't included in a dissent he wrote the next year when the commission voted to expand the subsidy to broadband.) O'Reilly has also backed the idea of a minimum contribution.

  • The counterpoint: Gonzalez said that requiring even a small contribution would push some Lifeline recipients into making tough spending choices. "A dollar, five dollars, that can feed a family dinner," she said.

Looking closely at fraud: Republicans want to cut down what they see as significant fraud in the program. "I think all of us would say we want Lifeline to meet the needs of those that have a need, and we want to make certain that the waste, fraud and abuse of the program is routed out," Blackburn said Wednesday.

  • The counterpoint: Amina Fazlullah, the Director of Policy for the Benton Foundation, said the FCC has already been "diligently working" to make the program more efficient.

More power to the states: Pai recently questioned whether the FCC has the authority to designate providers for the program at all, rather than the state-level officials who have traditionally done so. He said that putting "the designations on hold gives the FCC the chance to make sure the process is legally defensible and to avoid potentially stranding customers if the courts ultimately deem the process unlawful."

What's next: We wait. The FCC recently asked a federal court to hold off for 90 days on proceeding with two cases related to the FCC's expansion of the program to broadband. Pai has declined to comment on his plans for the program, as did an FCC spokesman on Wednesday.

Congress is also not yet ready to announce concrete actions, but Blackburn indicated this week that lawmakers on the House Energy and Commerce Committee plan to take a look. "I think that E&C has jurisdiction over this issue and when we decide what the appropriate action is going to be, we will take it," she said.

The bottom line: Closing the digital divide is going to be an ongoing topic of conversation, especially as Pai has made it priority. Once again, Lifeline is going to be a flashpoint in that debate over how government subsidies should be used to connect poor people in hard-to-reach regions.

Go deeper

Updated 30 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Omicron dashboard

Illustration: Shoshana Gordon/Axios

  1. Health: CDC director says number of U.S. Omicron cases "likely to rise" — Two years of COVID-19 — Prior coronavirus infections may not protect well against Omicron.
  2. Vaccines: Data demonstrates most-vaccinated counties less vulnerable to worst of COVID — Omicron adds urgency to vaccinating world — Omicron fuels the case for COVID boosters.
  3. Politics: Nevada to impose insurance surcharge on unvaccinated state workers — New Jersey GOP lawmakers defy statehouse COVID policy — Oklahoma sues Biden administration over Pentagon vaccine mandate.
  4. World: Vaccine mandates lose steam in the U.S. while Europe doubles downWHO: Delta health measures help fight Omicron — COVID cases surge in South Africa in sign Omicron wave is coming.
  5. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.

Vulnerable Democrats: Less Trump talk

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Vulnerable House Democrats are convinced they need to talk less about the man who helped them get elected: President Trump.

Why it matters: Democrats are privately concerned nationalizing the 2022 mid-terms with emotionally-charged issues — from Critical Race Theory to Donald Trump's role in the Jan. 6 insurrection — will hamstring their ability to sell the local benefits of President Biden's Build Back Better agenda.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Bipartisan tributes flood in for "giant of the Senate" Bob Dole

Then-Vice President Joe Biden and former Sen. Bob Dole at an event put on by the World Food Program where he was awarded the first “McGovern-Dole Leadership Award” in December 2013. Photo: Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call

Republican and Democratic politicians, including former Senate colleagues, are sharing condolences and memories commemorating the life of Bob Dole, who passed away at 98 on Sunday morning.

The big picture: Dole, the Republican presidential nominee in 1996, was the longest serving Republican leader in the Senate until 2018, when current Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell surpassed his record.