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This visualization is a modified version of Chernoff Faces, a technique that maps multiple statistical values to the features of a face. Because it's 2017, we expanded on the technique and made Chernoff Emojis. Each part of the emoji is controlled by the state's ranking in a given metric, which range from the uninsured rate to the percent of adults who report getting enough sleep.

Expand chart

Face color: This is mapped to the uninsured rate in every state — the greener and more sickly the face, the lower this state ranks in this metric. While the uninsured rate has decreased significantly in the past few years, it remains high in parts of the country. Texas tops the list with a whopping 17.1 percent uninsured rate, while Massachusetts has the country's lowest at 2.8 percent.

Eyebrows: The more furrowed the brow, the lower a state ranks in the unemployment rate. However, one important thing to note is that the unemployment data we used is from March 2017 and reflects that unemployment is at historic lows. New Mexico bottoms this list with an unemployment rate of 6.8 percent and Colorado is once again on top with a rate of 2.8 percent.

Eye size: The larger the eyes in each face, the larger the share of adults over 25 with a bachelor's degree. Colorado ranks first in the nation — with 24.8 percent — and West Virginia ranks last — with 11.7 percent.

Eye bags: The more pronounced these are in every face, the smaller the share of adults that report at least 7 hours of sleep each night, per a 2016 Centers for Disease Control study. South Dakota tops the list with 71.6 percent of adults reporting getting enough sleep. At the bottom of the list is Hawaii, with just 56.1 percent of adults reporting adequate sleep.

Mouth: The shape of the mouth is mapped to the poverty rate. Mississippi has the highest share of people living under the poverty line with 22 percent. New Hampshire has the lowest rate, with 8.2 percent.

Chin: The more noticeable this feature is, the higher this state ranks in obesity rates. Colorado has the lowest rate of obesity with 20.2 percent, and Louisiana has the highest with 36.2.

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.