May 30, 2017

The complex web of self-driving car relationships

Uber and Alphabet may be locked in a bitter legal battle over self-driving cars, but the two companies are intertwined financially and once were quite friendly with one another. It's just part of a very complex web of ride-hail relationships ― in terms of investments, personnel and strategic partnerships ― where rivalries and alliances are often one in the same.

Bottom line: As the ride-hail and autonomous car industries continue to grow, these relationships are likely to become even more conflicted.

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Uber to stop operating in Colombia following court order

Photo: Michal Fludra/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Uber will halt its operations in Colombia at the end of the month, after a judge found the transportation company violated the country's competition rules, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: Uber is likely to look for ways to get back into Columbia, though this comes as a blow to a business that is trying to show investors it can turn a profit and continue growing, especially in regions like Latin America. Uber called the decision "arbitrary" in a statement, and said it violated its right to due process, per Reuters.

Go deeper: Uber rolls out changes to California ride-hailing in wake of new law

Keep ReadingArrowJan 10, 2020

Ride-sharing of the future

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Auto companies, counterintuitively, are trying to get people to give up their cars — by making shared transportation more appealing with vehicles that recognize you, anticipate your needs and customize your ride.

Why it matters: Ride-hailing apps are making urban congestion steadily worse. In San Francisco, people spent 62% more time sitting in traffic in 2016 than in 2010. Uber and Lyft admitted they're part of the problem.

Go deeperArrowJan 3, 2020

Everyone's piling into the car of the future

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Some of the biggest surprises at CES came from big-name companies that seemed to stray from their traditional expertise: Sony debuted an electric car, Hyundai introduced a flying taxi and Toyota launched an entire city.

Why it matters: The mobility mash-up shows how multiple industries are converging around their desire to own the transportation experience for consumers — whether they are riding alone, or with strangers, with a robot behind the wheel or soaring over cities.

Go deeperArrowJan 10, 2020