Photo: Salwan Georges/The Washington Post via Getty Images

The last 24 hours have brought good and bad news for Tesla, which is grappling with the troubled production ramp-up of the Model 3 sedan and the exit of some top executives.

Why it matters: Investors and analysts are watching carefully to see whether Musk can make good on his pledge to finally reach a production rate of 5,000 Model 3s per week by mid-year.

Losing confidence: Per CNBC, a research note by Morgan Stanley analyst and longtime Tesla optimist Adam Jonas signaled his concern that the company's Model 3 woes could linger and slashed his stock price forecast:

"It is our view that the challenges in ramping up Model 3 production reflect fundamental issues of vehicle design, manufacturing process, and automation levels that can weigh against the profitability of the vehicle."

But, but, but: An internal company email Tuesday from CEO Elon Musk, obtained by the tech site Electrek, states: “It is looking quite likely that we will exceed 500 vehicles per day across all Model 3 production zones this week.”

  • The email implies they're on the cusp of already getting to over 3,500 per week, well above the 2,270 level the company said it reached in April.

The big picture: Tesla's fate is tethered to the success of Model 3. It's a vehicle imagined as a mass-market EV that can compete directly with popular mid-priced gasoline-powered sedans manufactured by the world's biggest automakers.

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Where it stands: Airline CEOs met Thursday with White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, who said President Trump would support an additional $25 billion from Congress to extend the current aid package through next March.

House Democrats ask DOJ watchdog to probe Durham's Trump-Russia investigation

Attorney General Bill Barr. Photo: Kamil Krzaczynsky/AFP via Getty Images

Four Democratic House committee chairs on Friday asked the Justice Department's inspector general to launch an "emergency investigation" into whether Attorney General Bill Barr and U.S. Attorney John Durham, his appointee, are taking actions that could "improperly influence the upcoming presidential election."

Catch up quick: Last year, Barr tapped Durham to conduct a sweeping investigation into the origins of the FBI's 2016 Russia probe, after he and President Trump claimed that it was unjustified and a "hoax."