Jan 24, 2018

Tech says no to AT&T's net neutrality pitch

Net neutrality protesters. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Tech and its allies in the net neutrality fight aren’t pleased with AT&T’s ad blitz arguing they should be subject to neutrality requirements, too.

Real talk: For now the two sides of this debate are talking past each other, so the ads and tech's response are political theatre.

  • “It is impossible to believe that AT&T is serious when they have such a long track record opposing consumer protections like net neutrality,” said Noah Theran, a spokesman for the trade group Internet Association that represents Google and Facebook.
  • “Online platforms like Google, Facebook and Amazon wield tremendous power,” said Matt Wood from Free Press. “But no matter how much it wants to pretend otherwise, when a company like AT&T connects you to the internet, that’s not the same thing as the information and content you find online.”

While ISPs would no doubt enjoy the certainty of legislation, they’ve already gotten what they want in the FCC’s repeal of the last net neutrality rules. And tech and the left have already decided on a near-term path forward.

  • They’ll sue to block the FCC repeal in federal court.
  • They’ll try and block it in Congress through a longshot resolution under the Congressional Review Act.
  • Democratic governors and state legislatures are moving to make net neutrality rules a reality at the state level. Governors in New York and Montana signed orders this week that would apply net neutrality rules to ISPs that worked with the state. Those could also be challenged in court.

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  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 5,543,439 — Total deaths: 347,836 — Total recoveries — 2,266,394Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 1,669,040 — Total deaths: 98,426 — Total recoveries: 379,157 — Total tested: 14,604,942Map.
  3. Trump administration: Mike Pence's press secretary returns to work after beating coronavirus.
  4. States: New York reports lowest number of new coronavirus deaths since March.
  5. Public health: The final data for remdesivir is in and its benefits are rather limited.
  6. Education: A closer look at how colleges can reopenNotre Dame president says science alone "cannot provide the answer" to reopening.
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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Pentagon watchdog sidelined by Trump resigns

Fine testiying before the Senate Judiciary Committee in 2017. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Glenn Fine, the Pentagon's principal deputy inspector general, submitted his resignation on Tuesday.

Why it matters: President Trump removed Fine as the Pentagon's acting inspector general in April 7 after a group of independent federal watchdogs selected him to lead the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee, which was set up to oversee the rollout of the $2 trillion coronavirus relief bill.

New York reports lowest number of daily coronavirus deaths since March

The number of daily new coronavirus cases and deaths reported in New York was the lowest since the state started its lockdown in March, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Tuesday, calling Memorial Day a "pivot point" for New York.

By the numbers: 73 New Yorkers died from coronavirus in the past 24 hours, and 200 people tested positive. Hospitalizations and intubations also decreased.