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Former Vungle CEO Zain Jaffer. Screengrab via vungle.com

Zain Jaffer is currently in a Silicon Valley jail cell, after being arrested for sexual assault of a child and attempted murder. He also has been put on indefinite leave as CEO of Vungle, the mobile video ad company that he founded in 2011.

The San Mateo County Sheriff's website shows that 29 year-old Jaffer was initially booked with felony charges for attempted murder, a lewd act on a child, oral copulation of a person under 14, child abuse, assault with a deadly weapon and a misdemeanor charge for battery upon an officer and emergency personnel. The attempted murder charge has since been dropped due to a lack of evidence.

Vungle did not initially issue a comment on Jaffer's arrest, except to say he has been suspended for personal reasons not having to do with the company. It has since issued the following statement:

"While we do not have any information that is not in the public record at this point, these are extremely serious allegations, and we are shocked beyond words. While these are only preliminary charges, they are obviously so serious that it led to the immediate removal of Mr. Jaffer from any operational responsibility at the company. The company stressed that this matter has nothing to do with Mr. Jaffer's former role at the company."

New CEO Rick Tallman later added in a statement that the company learned of the allegations late Monday night and convened a board meeting to remove Jaffer as CEO within 24 hours.

Record: Jaffer was arrested on Sunday and arraigned on Tuesday, according to Forbes, and his next court date is November 1. He is currently being held on bail at the Maple Street Correctional Center in Redwood City, California.

"Mr. Jaffer had pleaded not guilty and had no public comment at this time," Jaffer's attorney, Daniel Olmos, told Axios via email.

Investors: The San Francisco-based company has raised over $25 million in VC funding from firms like Google Ventures, Thomvest Ventures, Crosslink Capital, SoftTech VC and 500 Startups. Investors not represented on the board were informed yesterday of the CEO switch, but not of Jaffer's arrest. Google Ventures CEO David Krane provided the following statement:

"We are horrified by the news about Zain Jaffer and unequivocally condemn such behavior. Our hearts go out to the many people affected, particularly Zain Jaffer's family and the Vungle team."

The story has been updated with an updated timeline of events, and additional details and statements from Vungle and Jaffer's attorney. The headline has also been updated to reflect that the charge for attempted murder has since been dropped.

Go deeper

AP: Justice Dept. rescinds "zero tolerance" policy

A young girl waves to onlookers through the fence at the US-Mexico border wall at Friendship Park in San Ysidro, California in Nov. 2018. Photo: Sandy Huffaker/AFP via Getty Images

President Biden's acting Attorney General Monty Wilkinson issued a memo on Tuesday to revoke the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy, which separated thousands of migrant children from their families at the U.S.-Mexico border, AP first reported.

Driving the news: A recent report by Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz emphasized the internal chaos at the agency over the implementation of the policy, which resulted in 545 parents separated from their children as of October 2020.

Biden picks up his pen to change the tone on racial equity

Vice President Harris looks on as President Biden signs executives orders related to his racial equity agenda. Photo: Doug Mills-Pool/Getty Images

President Biden is making a down payment on racial equity in a series of executive orders dealing with everything from private prisons to housing discrimination, treatment of Asian Americans and relations with indigenous tribes.

The big picture: Police reform and voting rights legislation will take time to pass in Congress. But with the stroke of his pen, one week into the job Biden is taking steps within his power as he seeks to change the tone on racial justice from former President Trump.

Most Senate Republicans join Rand Paul effort to dismiss Trump's 2nd impeachment trial

Photo: Joshua Roberts-Pool/Getty Images

Forty-five Senate Republicans, including Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, supported an effort to dismiss former President Trump's second impeachment trial.

Why it matters: The vote serves as a precursor to how senators will approach next month's impeachment trial, making it highly unlikely the Senate will vote to convict. The House impeached Trump for a second time for "incitement of insurrection" following events from Jan 6. when a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol.

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