Inside the White House with D.C.'s most wired reporter. Sign up for Mike Allen's Axios AM.

Stories

Why the teacher pay wars have only just begun

Teachers striking
Protest signs from teachers. Photo: Logan Cyrus/AFP via Getty Images

Kentucky teacher Hope Brown is featured on the cover of Time Magazine's late September issue saying "I have a master's degree, 16 years of experience, work two extra jobs and donate blood plasma to pay the bills," in an effort to highlight the issue of inadequate teacher pay.

Why it matters: Brown's and other teacher's statements in the issue show why teachers are willing to fight for better pay despite significant sacrifices in school time.

The state of play: Teachers in seven states have already gone on strike this year, with teachers in Washington being the latest. Teachers in a handful of districts, including Seattle and Tacoma, have been willing to sacrifice school time for better pay.

Other states that have gone on strike include:

The big picture: More strikes are coming and they'll be here soon.

Yes, but: Strikes come with a cost. Teachers are missing school and that time missed concerns students, according to a Quizlet poll of 2,000 high school students. 68% of students polled were concerned about the impact strikes have on a school day.

Adapted from Quizlet; Chart: Axios Visuals

Tyler Murphy, a high school teacher in Kentucky, said students realize the strikes are for a greater cause if the lines of communication between teachers and students are open. The strikes foster a new "level of respect" for their teachers and their stand.

The bottom line: Teachers won't stop striking, even if there are concerns, until the issue of their pay is resolved. And that isn't likely to happen anytime soon.

More stories loading.