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Two Republicans senators are taking aim at former National Security Advisor Susan Rice over an email she sent herself during her last day in office to document a meeting between former FBI Director James Comey, former U.S. Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates, and President Obama about the Trump investigation.

Quick take: This will be treated like the Nunes FISA warrant memo by both the left and the right.

Is sending the email to herself particularly weird?

  • The conservative case: Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), Chuck Grassley (R-IA), and conservative media, seem to think so. The meeting took place on January 5, but the letter was not written until two weeks later.
  • The liberal case: The Obama administration took active steps to memorialize the investigation before the Trump administration took office to prevent the new administration from deleting it, according to multiple media reports. Like the Nunes memo, the Rice self-email contains some detail benefiting supporters of the investigation — Obama tried to detach the White House from the criminal investigation unless it was absolutely necessary to withhold information from a suspected Russian asset.

What's next: Grassley and Graham are not just emphasizing the "unusual" record keeping — they are also focusing on whether the meeting contained reference to the Steele dossier and Carter Page.

The pair have made a more nuanced argument than House Intelligence Republicans that the FISA warrant against Carter Page should not have been granted. This could indicate that investigation is ongoing despite the fizzle of the House memo.

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Supreme Court denies Pennsylvania GOP request to limit mail-in voting

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The Supreme Court on Monday denied a request from Pennsylvania's Republican Party to shorten the deadlines for mail-in ballots in the state. Thanks to the court's 4-4 deadlock, ballots can be counted for several days after Election Day.

Why it matters: It's a major win for Democrats that could decide the fate of thousands of ballots in a crucial swing state that President Trump won in 2016. The court's decision may signal how it would deal with similar election-related litigation in other states.

Microphones will be muted during parts of Thursday's presidential debate

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The Commission on Presidential Debates adopted new rules on Monday to mute microphones to allow President Trump and Joe Biden two minutes of uninterrupted time per segment during Thursday night's debate, AP reports.

Why it matters: In the September debate, Trump interrupted Biden 71 times, compared with Biden's 22 interruptions of Trump.

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Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Politics: Trump says if Biden's elected, "he'll listen to the scientists"Trump calls Fauci a "disaster" on campaign call.
  2. Health: Coronavirus hospitalizations are on the rise — 8 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week.
  3. States: Wisconsin judge reimposes capacity limit on indoor venues.
  4. Media: Trump attacks CNN as "dumb b*stards" for continuing to cover pandemic.
  5. Business: Consumer confidence surveys show Americans are getting nervousHow China's economy bounced back from coronavirus.
  6. Sports: We've entered the era of limited fan attendance.
  7. Education: Why education technology can’t save remote learning.