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SurveyMonkey wants to win over big businesses

Courtesy of SurveyMonkey

SurveyMonkey, the company best known for its easy-to-make surveys, is making a push into serving big businesses, and hopes to get its IPO plans back on track.

Why it matters: SurveyMonkey's had a rocky two years following the unexpected death of former CEO Dave Goldberg, which led to big management changes, a substantial layoff of employees in is business sales team, and uncertainty regarding IPO rumors at the time. CEO Zander Lurie told Axios the company is putting itself in a position to potentially go public in the future, helped by its new push, though going public isn't SurveyMonkey's only option.

New tools: The company is releasing new versions of three of its tools, including one for employee feedback—human resources is one of the top three uses of SurveyMonkey's surveys, according to Lurie.

New moves: SurveyMonkey also recently shook up its board of directors, with the addition of tennis star and entrepreneur Serena Williams and Intuit CEO Brad Smith. They replaced HP CEO Meg Whitman and Turbonomic executive chairman (and brief SurveyMonkey CEO) Bill Veghte.

The story has been updated to clarify that IPO rumors surfaced before Goldberg's death in 2015 and that it's only one of the company's options.

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Trump: Transgender people "disqualified" from the military

SecDef Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford.
Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford. Photo: Andrew Harrer-Pool / Getty Images

President Trump late Friday issued an order disqualifying most transgender people from serving in the military.

"[T]ransgender persons with a history or diagnosis of gender dysphoria -- individuals who the policies state may require substantial medical treatment, including medications and surgery -- are disqualified from military service except under certain limited circumstances."

Why it matters: Anything short of an inclusive policy for transgender troops will be viewed as a continuation of the ban Trump announced on Twitter in August.

Haley Britzky 3 hours ago
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Both Bush and Obama also requested line item veto power

Donald Trump.
Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Friday evening that to avoid having "this omnibus situation from ever happening again," he wants Congress to re-instate "a line-item veto."

Why it matters: This would allow him to veto specific parts of a bill without getting rid of the entire thing. Trump was deeply unhappy with the $1.3 trillion spending bill approved by Congress early Friday morning, but signed it anyway on Friday afternoon.