New York Public Library. Photo: Atilgan Ozdil/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Low-income black and Hispanic students are more susceptible to losing ground academically during summer breaks, and libraries help to lessen the pitfalls from the hiatus from reading and writing, Chalkbeat reports.

The big picture: President Trump has proposed to defund federal money toward public libraries. While that hasn't come to pass, public libraries are still at the mercy of potential cuts in city budgets, putting youth programs at risk.

Zooming in: Millions of dollars of cuts for New York City's 3 library branches —Brooklyn Public Library, Queens Public Library and New York Public Library — had been imminent under Mayor Bill de Blasio, which would have required some libraries to close on weekends.

  • After public outcry, de Blasio and City Council Speaker Corey Johnson agreed in June to provide city libraries with $33 million in additional funding, a historic high.

By the numbers: In 2018, nearly 1 million children and teens attended summer activities through New York City public libraries. More are estimated this summer with over 42,000 programs and events, Chalkbeat writes.

  • But, but, but: It all comes down to access, especially among students of color. Lack of access to transportation during the summer hinders attendance when working parents are unable to accompany their children to programs.

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Senate to vote on Amy Coney Barrett's confirmation on Oct. 26

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) in the Capitol on Oct. 20. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Senate will vote to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court next Monday, Oct. 26, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) announced Tuesday.

The big picture: The Senate Judiciary Committee will vote this Thursday to advance Barrett's nomination to the full Senate floor. Democrats have acknowledged that there's nothing procedurally that they can do to stop Barrett's confirmation, which will take place just one week out from Election Day.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Americans feel Trump's sickness makes him harder to trustFlorida breaks record for in-person early voting.
  2. Health: The next wave is gaining steam.
  3. Education: Schools haven't become hotspots.
  4. World: Ireland moving back into lockdown — Argentina becomes 5th country to report 1 million infections.

Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.