Sue Ogrocki / AP

Out today: A large team of energy experts say in a newly-published study that, from an economic and practical standpoint, achieving a nearly carbon emissions-free power system will require a wide range of energy sources, not just renewables.

Why it matters: The new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences comes amid a debate over how to eventually bring about the "deep decarbonization" needed to prevent the most dangerous levels of global warming.

"[T]he weight of the evidence suggests that a broad portfolio of energy options will help facilitate an affordable transition to a near-zero emission energy system."

The 21 authors say that while it's "theoretically possible" to build a reliable system based on wind, solar and hydropower, the reality is that a cost-effective decarbonization requires broader options including nuclear power and fossil fuels with carbon capture.

"A policy prescription that overpromises on the benefits of relying on a narrower portfolio of technologies options could be counterproductive, seriously impeding the move to a cost effective decarbonized energy system."

Go deeper: The paper is a rebuttal to high-profile research led by Stanford's Mark Jacobson that says the U.S. could affordably achieve 100 percent carbon-free power by roughly mid-century with only renewable technologies. The new study says Jacobson's work suffers from errors and faulty assumptions, such as unrealistic projections about use of large-scale storage systems.

Striking back: Jacobson has published a response to the new study here, defending the idea of creating a reliable systems built on 100 percent renewables and alleging that the newly released study misrepresents his team's work.

Go deeper

2 hours ago - World

Macron visits Beirut promising a "new political pact" for Lebanon

Macron visits the hard-hit Gemmayzeh neighborhood. Photo: AFP via Getty Images

French President Emmanuel Macron walked through the blast-damaged streets of Beirut on Thursday, swarmed by people chanting for the fall of Lebanon's government and pleading for international aid.

Why it matters: Lebanon is at a breaking point. Its economy was collapsing and its government hardly functioning — all before a massive explosion destroyed swathes of the capital city, including its vital port.

2 hours ago - Sports

The PGA Championship is golf's first major in over a year

Photo: Gary Kellner/PGA of America via Getty Images

The 2020 PGA Championship tees off Thursday at San Francisco's TPC Harding Park, which is hosting its first-ever major.

Why it matters: It's the first major in more than a year — and the first of seven majors in the next 12 months. Though there won't be any fans in attendance, the excitement is palpable.

July's jobs report could be an inflection point for the coronavirus recovery

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Even if Friday's jobs report shows a big number, it is becoming clear hiring slowed and likely even reversed course in July and real-time indicators suggest the employment situation worsened into August.

Driving the news: Payroll processor ADP's monthly jobs report showed private companies added 167,000 jobs last month, well below the 1.2 million expected by economists and far below June's 4.8 million jobs added.